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Revolution annuelle de la terre autour du soleil. Compose et dessine par H Nicollet. Le texte de les fig. suppl. par E. Soulier. Paris, publie par J. Andriveau-Goujon, Rue du Bac, no. 17, 1850.

About this series

Over the next few weeks I will post a series of brief step-by-step "how-to" tutorials on making use of digital resources from the David Rumsey Map Center and Collection, that I presented in my "Hacking Rumsey" talk, presented at the opening events for The David Rumsey Map Center, at Stanford University Library.

We're starting small, with the easiest tools (like the David Rumsey Map Collection MapTab Chrome Browser Plug-in, which I covered in a previous post) that appeal to the most people, first. Eventually we will work our way up through more complex use of the collections and tools available from The Stanford University Library.

The David Rumsey Map Collection Chrome Browser plug-in

About this series

As part of the opening events for The David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford's Green Library I recently gave a talk about the various ways you can "hack" the David Rumsey Map Collection. I showed how you can make use of the David Rumsey Map Collection using a variety of Stanford University Library resources and services.

Over the next few weeks I will post a series of brief step-by-step "how-to" tutorials on making use of digital resources from the David Rumsey Map Center and Collection. For the most part, I will be highlighting the resources I presented in my talk.

Colleagues who worked on the Rumsey Map Center Project

Today marks the end of our first week of the opening of the David Rumsey Map Center as a library and special collections center within Green. Between the opening and this week, we have had over 600 visitors and now that the excitement of the opening is behind us, I want to take this opportunity to thank you all for being instrumental in making this happen.

From January 25th to 29th, we hosted Geo4LibCamp 2016 at the Hartley Conference Center and Branner Library. Inspired by the success of LDCX 2015, this inaugural event was planned as a hands-on meeting to bring together those building digital repository and associated services for geospatial data. We wanted to focus on sharing best practices, solving common problems, and addressing technical issues.

A snipped of a The Atlantic article in December 12, 2015 feature a Stanford University Libraries Map of California as an Island

Our maps continued to be used in publications - today, another article featuring a map of California as an Island, was published in the The Atlantic's Citylab edition.

Stanford's Smith Map in the Newspaper

In today's mail, the newspaper arrived. It wasn't the San Francisco Chronicle on the San Jose Mercury News though. It was a copy of the Finnish newspaper Turun Sanomat, published in Turku, Finland. It wasn't until I turned to page 15 that I recognized something - a reproduction of the 1815 William Smith Map that we had scanned. William Smith published a map of Geology of what is now a good part of the UK, and earlier this year, we, along with the British Geological Society, celebrated 200 years since its publication. The map and article, all in Finnish of course, presumeably talks about the story of the man and how William Smith single-handedly authored and published this map. The newspaper used our scan both in the paper version and also in their online version. 

TYPE OF RESOURCE
Cartographic
FORMAT
Map/Globe
unmediated, sheet
1 map : color ; 345 x 504 cm
IMPRINT
Japan, 1837
ISSUANCE
monographic
PUBLISHER
Place of publication not given : : Publisher not given,, 1837
LANGUAGE
Japanese
MAP DATA
Scale 1:21,600.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License

By Deardra Fuzzell and Wayne Vanderkuil
A historic manuscript map and a gem of the Stanford Library Map Collection, the ?mi Kuni-ezu ????? Japanese Tax Map from 1837 is hand drawn and painted in the round. This map is designed to be displayed on the floor with the viewer standing in its center. From this central vantage point, the map may be read with ease from any direction. As this display and viewing method is no longer possible for a map fast approaching its 200th birthday, Stanford has recently digitized this item to enable access for research, teaching and learning as well as preservation of the original object.

This the largest and most difficult oversized map Stanford has digitized thus far.
See how the Map Program went about imaging this unique item.

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