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Image of the Kendua Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Task

The Stanford Geospatial Center, in support of a project headed by Stanford University Pediatric Global Health Physician/Scientist Eric Nelson, will host a Mapathon! where volunteer mappers will help create basemap data for a project to improve the quality and access to care for children in Bangladesh during cholera outbreaks.

Volunteer mappers from Eastern University in Dhaka, Bangladesh will be collaborating and mapping simultaneously. We will be able to share the work we accomplish and look at each other's mapping contribution. Read more about the project in a recent blog post about the humanitarian effort.

EVENING AGENDA

6:00 - 7:00pm Kick-off. Let's Map: Learn more about the project, Learn more about OpenStreetMap.org and learn more about Humanitarian Mapping! Beginner mappers will receive training.

7:00 - 7:30pm Food break (Free Pizza & Soda Provided)

7:30 - 9:00pm Mapathon Mapping!

To sign up, please for the event, please visit our Evenbrite Page!

Branner Libary Centennial June 14, 1915 – June 14, 2015

Join us in celebrating the milestone of 100 years of collaboration, education, and experience at the Branner Earth Sciences Library & Map Collection.

We'll be hosting a series of anniversary events over the next 100 days that will culminate on Thursday, June 11, 2015, with a public celebration, speakers, and a curator's tour of the library. In addition, each week between now and the anniversary on June 14, 2015, we'll be exhibiting items from our collection and archive. You can see these items on display in the Branner Library exhibit case on the 2nd floor of the Mitchell Earth Sciences Building. Check below for more information about this week's exhibit and upcoming Branner 100 events.

Branner, John Casper. “The Clays of Arkansas” in The U. S. Geological Survey. Bulletin 351. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1908. Taken from http://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/0351/plate-1.pdfThe Writings of John Casper Branner, Stanford’s Second President 
Friday, March 13 – Thursday, March 26

This exhibition commemorates the 100th anniversary of the University's purchase of John Casper Branner’s personal geological library, the foundation for the current Branner Earth Sciences Library. 

A prolific writer, Branner published over 400 articles and books during his lifetime, many of which are kept at Branner Library. A sampling of his writing is included in the exhibit, including resources written about the clays of Arkansas while he was State Geologist of Arkansas.

Eight new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. Several of these collections take advantage of recently enhanced functionality which better integrates material in the Stanford Digital Repository with data contained in Symphony and enables discovery of and access to media files.

By Deardra Fuzzell and Wayne Vanderkuil
A historic geologic map, the data for which was compiled over the course of many years by one determined man, William Smith. Completed nearly 2 centuries ago, it remains incredibly relevant.

This is one of the largest and most difficult oversized objects Stanford has digitized thus far.
See how the Digital Production Group went about imaging this unique item.

Planisfero del mondo vecchio, 1691?

Hemispheres in cartography refer to slicing the globe into spherical halves. Generally, hemispheres we see in maps are Northern or Southern, where the equator is the dividing line and Eastern and Western, or where the prime meridian, East and West of 180˚ longitude, bisects the two. 

A collection of six maps from Glen McLaughlin's Map Collection of California as an Island, give you a peek at a few hemispheric maps published between 1683 and 1807 and show how hemispheres were sliced differently on maps between the 17th and 19th century. Visit Branner Library to view them in person. The exhibit will run from until April 23, 2014.

San Francisco from the David Rumsey Map Collection: SFO Airport Exhibit

The new exhibit installed at the San Francisco International Airport Museum, comes from the David Rumsey Map Collection, with a few items from Stanford University Libraries and the San Francisco Public Library.  Exhibited in a magnificent space, these iconic set of maps are at the airport exhibition gallery in Terminal 2 (Virgin America and American Airlines). The exhibit is accessible after going through security. The exhibit combines the original maps with digital representations and includes videos and Google Earth overlays.

For more on the exhibit, see their press release.

Check out what Wired has to say about it! Also David himself has blogged about it.

The exhibit is currently open and will remain so until August 3, 2014. If you cannot make it, check out a selection showcased in the digital gallery. You can also browse them in detail at davidrumsey.com.

Many thanks to my colleagues at Branner, Preservation and Special Collections for supporting this exhibit.

 

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