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IPA Source is the largest collection of literal translations and International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcriptions on the web. The goal of IPA Source is to promote the comprehension and accurate pronunciation of foreign language texts in art song and opera in order that the singer may imbue each syllable with the appropriate emotional content. IPA Source offers texts to works for the solo voice in Latin, Italian, German, French, Spanish, and English. Our guiding principle is to offer great depth of literature in each language before adding a new "singing" languages. (Description taken from IPA Source web site)

Use of the database is restricted to Stanford users. Remember that if you are connecting from off campus, you will need to configure your web browser to use Stanford’s authenticated proxy server.

IPA Source has been added to the list of Databases and Indexes on the Music Library’s web page for your convenience.

“So, it’s the original karaoke machine?”

A recent visitor on a tour to the Archive of Recorded Sound made this comment to me as I showed off the roll I was cataloging. On plain beige paper, at first it looked like a regular piano roll. A label at the beginning. Expression and performance data perforations appeared as I unrolled the roll. Then, at the side: words! You can imagine gathering around the piano to sing along with a group of friends at a party, just as Stanford undergrads may have done at the Stanford Student Union in 1915 or Encina Commons in 1926.

Chopin's signature, from MLM 217 (detail)

View or download:

Piosnka litewska (Lithuanian song), op. 74, no. 16 [1830?]

Drei Ecossaises, op. 72, no. 3 (sketches) [1830?]

A song and piano sketches by Chopin share two sides of a single leaf, once belonging to Polish ethnologist and composer Oskar Kolberg (1814- 1890), and now residing in Stanford's Memorial Library of Music.  The Kolberg and Chopin families were neighbors, and Oskar followed Chopin at the Warsaw Lyceum, studying piano with one of Chopin’s teachers. Kolberg was a lifelong collector of music manuscripts, focusing on Polish folk and national music, which he used in his scholarly endeavors.

Mendelssohn. Sechs Lieder. Breitkopf, ca. 1846 (detail)

A sampling of printed music covers in the Music Library exhibit cases celebrates the art of lithography, providing examples of decorative frames and borders as well as scenes depicting various subjects. The nineteenth century saw a shift in music printing methods from engraving to lithography, a technique which allowed for increasingly fine decorative detail as is reflected in the covers on display. Artistic renderings of pictorial scenes, fanciful borders, and varieties of fonts helped attract buyers; advertised the skills of the artist; and, when prominently displayed on the parlor piano, evidenced the refined taste of the household.

During recent processing of the Paul F. Roth American Dance Band Collection, staff at the Archive of Recorded Sound uncovered an rare recording featuring the American actress and singer, Ethel Merman.

Score notes (detail)

For your browsing pleasure, we present the following list of new scores added to composer complete editions, historical sets, and facsimiles:

Modern editions

Bach, JS. Kammermusik mit Violine / Johann Sebastian Bach ; herausgegeben von Peter Wollny. Bd.3.

Eisler. Film music to Nuit et brouillardGesamtausgabe = Complete edition / Hanns Eisler. Ser.VI, Bd.23.

Gluck. L'Arbre enchanté, ou, Le Tuteur dupéSämtliche Werke / Christoph Willibald Gluck. Ser.4, Vol.10.

Rite of Spring, facsimile (detail)

For your browsing pleasure, we present the following list of new scores added to composer complete editions, historical sets, and facsimiles:


Modern editions:

Rossini. Sei Sonate a Quattro per Violini, violoncello e contrabbasso. Edizione critica delle opere di Gioachino Rossini / comitato di redazione, Bruno Cagli, Philip Gossett, Alberto Zedda (ser.6/4)

Schönberg. Serenade, op. 24. Sämtliche Werke / Arnold Schönberg ; herausgegeben von Josef Rufer (Abt. VI: Kammermusik, Reihe B, Bd. 23/1)

Recording date on a Welte-Mignon roll label

How do you know a publication date? For most books, simply look for the copyright or edition information at the beginning. For mass produced modern CDs, check the edge of the disc surface for the “p date”, or maybe it will be in the booklet inserted into the container. But what about piano rolls for reproducing and player pianos? Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound’s Player Piano Project faces this question. The publication date certainly isn’t stamped on the label, yet we need it.