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     In 1886, a sixteen-year-old named Fred Buenzle did what many boys had dreamed of: joining the Navy and sailing the high seas. Recognizing that the Navy was changing rapidly, he took note of the stories and lore of old salts and devoted himself to chronicling his own adventures; training in the Caribbean, briefly leaving the service in China, and in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. A stenographer who rose in rank to Chief Yeoman, Buenzle was the court reporter for the investigation of the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine, and took dictation for many of the Navy’s highest officers, including Theodore Roosevelt when he was briefly Secretary. Buenzle also founded and edited “The Bluejacket,” the first newsletter for enlisted men, and fought against discrimination of uniformed sailors.

     Special Collections has recently acquired and processed the Fred J. Buenzle papers, which contain scrapbooks, unpublished manuscripts, and hundreds of photographs documenting his naval career, family, and subsequent retirement at his ranch in Los Gatos.

St. Thomas, 1891

Albumen print of St. Thomas from Buenzle scrapbook, May 1891.

 

California as an Island Banner Image

The Glen McLaughlin Map Collection of California as an Island is now available online.The 731 maps were collected by Glen McLaughlin over a period of 40 years and acquired by Stanford in 2012. It is the largest known private collection of maps showing California as an island. It is now available for anyone to search, find, view and download via the Stanford University Library's catalog. Please visit californiaisland.stanford.edu to read more about the collection. Viewing the paper maps will be on a per-request basis.


"Access an array of data across subjects and regions, providing a comprehensive picture of research output to understand data in context and maximize research efforts.  The Data Citation Index on the Web of Knowledge platform provides a single point of access to quality research data from repositories across disciplines and around the world.

Updated daily, Current Contents Connect is a multidisciplinary current awareness web resource providing access to complete bibliographic information of the world's leading scholarly journals.   It provides complete tables of contents and bibliographic information, including abstracts, from about 8,000 journals, 2,000 books, and 7,000 scholarly web sites.  It includes pre-published electronic journal articles and links to the full text.   Database coverage: 1998 to the present.

The records of Road & Track were given to Stanford University Libraries by Hearst Corporation, Inc. in October 2012. (Please see Stanford Report Dec. 11, 2012 for details.)

Beginning in early 2013 a box survey of the collection was begun and has just been completed this August. Plans are now afoot to create an index of feature articles in the Road & Track magazine this fall before the Manuscripts Unit relocates to SUL’s Redwood City location.

Processing of the collection will begin after the relocation and the hiring of a project archivist. Funds for processing have been provided in part by Stanford’s Revs Program

BrowZine is a tablet application that lets you browse, read and monitor thousands of scholarly journals available from the Stanford University Libraries.


•    Browse titles by subject to easily find journals of interest
•    Create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals
•    Be alerted when a new issue of a journal is published
•    Save articles in your personal library.  BrowZine can easily be synced up with Box.com, Mendeley, Zotero, and other services to help keep all of your information together in one place. 

In May, the creators of a new, unique data mining tool -- Enigma -- made a presentation to a group of Political Science Department graduate students. It would be safe to say that the demonstration generated some real interest and excitement. Based in great part on that response from students in the department, the Library has now arranged a long-term beta-test with Enigma for the entire Stanford community. The only other academic institution with this arrangement is the Harvard Business School.

Enigma has ingested, and continues to ingest, digitized public records from the federal government, state governments, international organizations, and from some non-U.S. governments. They began amassing data by making a FOIA request for all U.S. government domain names and then scraped and ingested all of the data available on those sites. They continue to ingest new data every week.

Enigma is very interested in engaging with Stanford scholars to get ideas for additional digital data sets to include in their database. In other words, they really want to hear from you about data that might be valuable to your research. So, as you use Enigma, please take advantage of the Chat function to make suggestions/requests. One caveat -- Enigma does not digitize data. However, they are pretty inventive in finding ways to obtain digital data that should be in the public domain. For example, they take in U.S Customs Service data regarding all containers that pass through U.S. ports. This data is only made available by the Customs Service on CD's, which Enigma uploads on a weekly basis.

Enigma can be accessed by all members of the Stanford community through this link:

http://ezproxy.stanford.edu/login?url=https://app.enigma.io

Here is Enigma's own description of what they are trying to accomplish:

Enigma is a search and discovery platform for big public data that exposes billions of public records across previously siloed datasets. Petabytes of pubic data are created by governments, companies, and independent institutions each year. However, as many of us know, it is tedious (if not impossible in some cases) to navigate and discover connections across these disconnected resources. Enigma empowers its users to search and manipulate these hidden datasets, creating priceless information needed to gain an edge and uncover a universe of untapped knowledge. Whether you are searching for people, companies, places, social, political, and economic trends, or broader topics, Enigma offers depth and resolution into these pools of data that are currently unavailable or underutilized by traditional search portals like Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

Let us know what you think of this new and powerful statistical tool.

Listen to the Silence conference, 2013

The University Archives is pleased to showcase the results of ongoing efforts to collect and make available online born-digital materials from Stanford student organizations. The first such collection to be made available via the Stanford Digital Repository is records of the annual "Listen to the Silence" conference organized by the Asian American Students' Association (AASA).<--break->

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