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Screenshot of Riverwalk Jazz website

Did you read the news a few months ago about the Riverwalk Jazz archive coming to Stanford? Now the collection of radio shows is available online, featuring two channels of continuous audio streams: http://riverwalkjazz.stanford.edu/.

As fans of the long-running public radio program know, Riverwalk Jazz tells the story of early jazz and blues as it evolved in the first half of the 20th century. Using rich narrative, oral histories and interviews, clips of historic musical recordings, and live musical performances by the Jim Cullum Jazz Band, each radio show entertains and educates its listeners, promoting classic jazz music and an appreciation for its place in history. With this new web site, the series of programs is presented by the Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound as an incomparable research collection for use by jazz scholars and fans alike.

Rock’s Backpages is one of two new subscription databases now available for use by the Stanford community (Academic Charts Online will be highlighted in a future post).

From the website:

"There are over twenty thousand articles on the site. These feature over two thousand five hundred artists and range from 500-word album (or concert) reviews to 10,000-word interviews and features. 

Edgcumbe, Musical Reminiscences of an Old Amateur Chiefly Respecting the Italian Opera in England for Fifty Years, from 1773 to 1823 (London, 1824)

Richard Edgcumbe, 2nd earl of Mount Edgcumbe (1764-1839)
Musical reminiscences of an old amateur, chiefly respecting the Italian opera in England for fifty years, from 1773 to 1823. The second edition / continued to the present time.
London : W. Clarke, New Bond Street, 1827.
Acquired through the Lucie King Harris Book Fund for Music

Described as an English opera enthusiast and amateur composer, Mount Edgcumbe is said to have attended the King's Theatre, London, from the age of nine, and acquired sufficient musical skill to compose an opera, Zenobia. He recorded his experiences in Musical Reminiscences of an Old Amateur Chiefly Respecting the Italian Opera in England for Fifty Years, from 1773 to 1823 (London, 1824). Subsequent editions (1827, 1828, 1834/R) extended the period under discussion. The Reminiscences are a valuable complement to contemporary British writings such as those of Charles Burney and William Parke. Mount Edgcumbe's tastes were formed during the late 1770s and early 1780s and were reinforced during his European tour of 1783–5, when he visited Vienna and various Italian cities (he again travelled abroad in 1802). His vivid descriptions of the leading singers of the age, several of whom he knew personally, shed light on matters such as the allocation of roles. ~Grove Online

3. Symphonie / von Gustav Mahler.
Wien : J. Weinberger, [1899?]

3. Symphonie / von Gustav Mahler.
Wien : J. Weinberger, [1899?]
Acquired through the Susan & Ruth Sharp Book Fund.

Dritte Symphonie D Moll / von Gustav Mahler.
Wien : Universal-Edition, [19--]
Acquired through the Susan & Ruth Sharp Book Fund.

The first and second editions of Mahler’s third symphony increase the number of source materials for the work in the Memorial Library of Music in the Department of Special Collections, which already included two sketches and a corrected first edition. This copy of the first edition contains extensive manuscript corrections and alterations in a neat hand in red ink throughout, possibly from a member of Mahler’s circle, or of a professional copyist from the publisher Universal. Stanford owns another copy of the first edition which also contains corrections by an unknown source. Mahler is known to have constantly revised his works so that sources such as these may provide significant insight into his process. Besides the two annotated first editions at Stanford, there are other annotated copies at the Internationale Gustav Mahler Gesellschaft in Vienna, which has corrections in Mahler’s handwriting and another hand, the Library of Congress, and New York Public Library. The handwriting in the first Stanford copy and the New York Public copy seem to be similar. We do not fully know what the relationship is between these copies or what the information in them tells us. When one compares the newly acquired first and second editions, it is evident that the corrections and alterations noted in the first edition were made in the published second.

Additional images, with examples of annotations and corrections:

 

 

There have been two news stories in the last couple of days about exciting new acquisitions here in the Stanford University Libraries. Yesterday there was a piece in The Dish about a book that the Art & Architecture Library has purchased that features an original 1869 etching by Edouard Manet. And in today's Stanford Report there's a story about a collection of 800 maps showing California as an island that's coming to the Branner Earth Sciences Library and Map Collections and that will soon be available digitally.

What's the first name you think of when considering the development of electronic music? Edgard Varèse? John Cage? Karlheinz Stockhausen? Now how about computer music? Max Mathews should be at the top of your list. While at Bell Laboratories in 1957, Mathews wrote the program MUSIC, ushering in an era of digital synthesis and composition. MUSIC went through many iterations, but its lasting influence can be seen in contemporary programs such as Max/MSP, itself named after the late pioneer.

Mathews' connection to Stanford is through the Department of Music and the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. Named a Professor of Music (Research) in 1985, Mathews continued pursuing digital sound synthesis techniques until his death on April 21, 2011. Although his recorded output is small, his contribution to the genre is no less important; he rightfully stands side by side with more prominent names on this illustrious compilation featuring the "early gurus of electronic music".  

His archives, which includes papers, digital files, video, and audio recordings, was acquired by University Archives earlier this year by way of Jerry McBride, Head Librarian of the Music Library. Once the finding aid was complete, the Stanford Media Preservation Lab took on the reformatting duties for the media portion. Part of the work will be completed in our lab over the coming month, while the rest will be outsourced to a vendor

All of the digital files will be available to the world in the not too distant future. Until then, here's a sample of what to expect.

Pontificale secundum ritum Sacrosancte Romane Ecclesie
Lugduni : Per probum virum Hector Penet., 1542

Pontificale secundum ritum Sacrosancte Romane Ecclesie : cum multis additionibus opportunis ex apostolica bibliotheca sumptis: et alias non impressis: quarum breuis index post epistola[m]. S. Domino Domino nostro pape dicata[m] statim sese offert. Aptissimis figuris gestus & motus personarum ex officiorum decoro exprimentibus excultum. Quottationibus etiam marginalibus auctoritatum sacre pagine in eo existentium: quo libro: quoto quoq[ue] capite habeantur signatum. Opus sane laudabile atq[ue] diuinum.

BX2030 .A2 1542  Locked Stacks: Ask at loan desk

Oxford Music Online defines a pontificale or pontifical as “A liturgical book of the Western Church containing rites proper to a bishop: the dedication of churches, the consecration of altars, the blessing of sacred vessels, conferral of clerical ordination, the blessing of abbots and abbesses, confirmation, the blessing of the holy oils. It often contains music for these rites.” The volume is printed in red and black throughout and contains woodcut illustrations and headings, and historiated and ornamental  initials.

 

Artemisia title page

Artemesia is the last of Cimarosa’s almost sixty operas, with libretto by Count Giovanni Battista Colloredo who wrote under the pen name of Cratisto Jamejo. Cimarosa completed only two of the acts; the third was completed by an unknown person. The opera premiered at La Fenice in Venice in January 1801, was performed in Florence in 1806, and was likely performed in England, Germany and Russia. Arias from the opera were published in the early nineteenth century and the overture in 1957. However the full opera has never been published. This two-volume manuscript copy was produced in Venice by the well known copying shop of Valentino Bertoja, who at one time was Haydn’s second cellist at Esterháza. It is inscribed to Alvise Mocenigo, a member of one of the most renowned patrician families of the Venetian Republic.

Acquired through the Lucie King Harris Books for Music Fund.

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