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Stanford has trial access to eArticle, New Nonmun and KSDC DB from October 1 to November 30, 2015.

  • eArticle:   

    Provides full-text journal articles in all subjects.

  • New Nonmun:   

    Provides full-text journal articles in all subjects.

  • KSDC (Korea Social Science Data Center) DB:   

    Provides data from statistical yearbooks published by the government, public institutions and overseas institutions and data collected from opinion polls and surveys undertaken by the government, universities, research institutes, and other organizations. Users can analyze KSDC data on the website.

Sylvan Bar, Valley of Yosemite

October 1, 2015, marks the 125th anniversary of the establishment of Yosemite National Park. To commemorate our nation’s third National Park, the University Archives has mounted an exhibition of photographs of Yosemite Valley taken by Eadweard Muybridge in 1872. On display are ten albumen photographs printed from replicated negatives made from photographs by Muybridge in 1872. This set of images comes from a limited edition printed by the Chicago Albumen Works, Inc. and published by Yosemite Natural History Association in 1977. Only 50 sets were produced. To read more about this amazing series of photographs follow this link. To view additional Muybridge photographs held by the Stanford University Libraries follow this link.

The photographs are on display in Green Library, 2nd Floor, near the Human Resources office (241) located near the middle of the Bing and East Wings. Viewing hours are Monday-Friday from 8AM to 5PM.

Joseph Goldyne exhibit poster, Stanford University Libraries
A new exhibition on the second floor of the Green Library Bing Wing features the work of artist Joseph Goldyne, whose unique small-format prints using intaglio printmaking processes are credited with reviving the art of the varied edition monoprint beginning in the late 1970s. After earning a medical degree at UCSF (1968), Goldyne turned his full attention to art and never looked back. His work is informed by his study and documentation of human anatomy as well as his near-encyclopedic knowledge of art history, credentialed by a graduate degree in fine arts from Harvard.
Center for Latin American Studies tag cloud image

As Fall term came to a close in 1965, Stanford received good news: the Ford Foundation had approved a grant proposal to establish a new program "for training and research in Latin American Studies…" (1) The three-year grant for $550,000 included an allocation of $75,000 for "library improvement." (2) Thus began the Center for Latin American Studies, "The Center," as we know it today.

Welcome to Leith movie banner
Sundance Film Festival's "Welcome to Leith", a documentary about a North Dakota town facing an attempted takeover by extremists, opens today in theaters across North America AND is screening on Kanopy from today. 
Welcome to Leith chronicles the attempted takeover of a small town by notorious white supremacist Craig Cobb. As his behavior becomes more threatening, tensions soar, and the residents desperately look for ways to expel their unwanted neighbor. With incredible access to both longtime residents of Leith and white supremacists, the film examines a small community in the plains struggling for sovereignty against an extremist vision. 
Kanopy  is providing access to this film to Stanford users.  Watch now
Natalie Jean Marine-Street

The Stanford Historical Society (SHS) and University Archives are pleased to announce that Natalie Jean Marine-Street has joined our ranks as the Oral History Program Manager (OHPM) for the SHS. As OHPM, Natalie will manage current oral history projects, plan and execute new projects, and serve as steward for existing SHS oral history collections.

Natalie is a Ph.D. candidate in United States History at Stanford. Her research focuses on the interrelationships between business, gender, and politics and the role of persuasion in the economy.  Her dissertation project examines the history of female sales agents who, from the mid-nineteenth century, sought economic independence by travelling to sell new, mass-produced consumer goods. Inquiring about “lady agents” sheds light on how mass consumerism spread, how work and identity interact, and how occupations become gender-typed, contributing to economic inequality.

Please join us in welcoming Natalie to the fold.

Franz Kunst

We are thrilled to announce that Franz Kunst has joined our Department as a Manuscripts Processing Archivist. Please join us in welcoming him to the fold.

This is not his first appearance in Special Collections as he has been at Stanford University since 2006, when he began working as an intern at the Hoover Institute on an assessment of their audio holdings for their Radio Free Europe collection. In 2007 he joined the Manuscripts Division in Special Collections and has worked for us and the Archives of Recorded Sound on many special projects over the past nine years. Some of these have been bulk processing projects which opened up over 80 undocumented collections in the Archives of Recorded Sound and several large collections in Special Collections, including: Douglas Engelbart, Donald McQuivey, Washington Apple Pi. Additionally Franz has completed several smaller collections: Karl Cohen, Tom Law poster collection, Fred Buenzle.

 Other notable projects are: the Riverwalk Jazz Project and the Educational Collections project where he processed several major collections, such as the papers of Ruth Asawa and Gyorgy Kepes. Franz has a B.A. from UNC, Chapel Hill in American Studies and Folklore and an MLIS from San Jose State University. 

Theremin demonstrating his instrument, Stanford University, 1991

Earlier this year, I reported on recent work the Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) had undertaken to preserve video footage of Leon Theremin's visit to Stanford in 1991. In addition to participating in a symposium during his visit, hosted by the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), Theremin was also the guest of honor at a concert held in Frost Amphitheater on September 27, 1991 during the Stanford Centennial Finale Weekend. The video footage preserved by the ARS earlier in the year unfortunately only included part of this notable concert. It was found to be missing some key performances, including an arrangement of Rachmaninov's Vocalise, featuring Theremin's daughter Natasha Theremin playing the vocal parts on her father's instrument, accompanied by Max Mathews conducting the orchestral parts with his radio batons. This footage was presumed lost...until now.