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Terman Engineering Library stacks

During June and July, the Terman Engineering Library will continue to reduce the number of items on the shelves in the library in order to add additional student study space.  This project will include the transfer of approximately 4500 books to SAL3 and the removal of four ranges of shelving, a 40% reduction in shelving capacity.  After the move of collections, the library will have approximately 7000 items on the remaining four stack ranges.  The newly available floor space will allow for six new study tables and four new individual study carrels, a total of 28 additional seats, representing a 30% increase in seating capacity at the library. Mike Nack, project lead, has prepared a summary document.   The library will be open during the move of materials, although during the dismantling of the stacks currently scheduled for the second week of July, students may want to find a quieter location to study.

Researchers at Stanford are doing a lot of innovative and intriguing work. Their efforts are often highlighted in the Stanford Report, which provides readers with a brief compilation of the latest Stanford News via email each weekday. When those of us at Stanford Libraries who work on digital preservation read these articles, we immediately wonder what these researchers are doing to preserve all that wonderful research data.

Never ones to rest on our laurels, Stanford Libraries staff have been reaching out to these researchers and recommending that they preserve the data generated from these studies -- and sometimes submitted to journals as supplementary data files -- in the Stanford Digital Repository. We would hate to see all that innovative and intriguing work lost to the ravages of time!

Three new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Stanford Geospatial Center Teaching Data

Abstract: These items are intended for use in Stanford Geospatial Center teaching materials.

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

This exhibition honors faculty research from the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences. Many of the papers highlighted in this exhibition are seminal works in the fields of energy, environmental sciences and climate change, and geologic and geophysical research.

Ever wondered what the most checked out books by Stanford authors were at Branner Library? So did we. Included in the exhibit are two such titles that are frequently used: Introduction to Geochemistry by Prof. Dennis Bird and Reservoir Geomechanics by Prof. Mark Zoback. Other notable titles are more recent, such as books authored by Dean Pam Matson and Prof. Rosamond Naylor.

A sampling of faculty titles on display at Branner Library.

In response to Friday’s powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Nepal, Stanford volunteer “crisis mappers” are working with Humanitarian OpenStreetMap to assist in disaster relief by mapping Nepal’s road networks, buildings, and residential areas.

Anyone with a laptop and spare time can help responders on the ground. The Stanford Geospatial Center housed in the Branner Earth Sciences Library will be hosting ongoing Introductory Relief Mapping sessions all week to help train people to use OpenStreetMap, an open source and open data sharing tool adding information to relief effort maps. Drop-in volunteers are encouraged to join all day from 9am-9pm, Monday-Friday.

The first Introductory Relief Mapping session will be held Monday, April 17 from 6-7pm at the Branner Earth Sciences Library Teaching Corner, on the 2nd floor of the Mitchell Earth Science Building.

Salmon data in EarthWorks

Stanford University Libraries is happy to introduce EarthWorks, our new geospatial data discovery application. EarthWorks is a discovery tool for geospatial (a.k.a. GIS) data. It allows users to search and browse the GIS collections owned by Stanford University Libraries, as well as data collections from many other institutions. Data can be searched spatially, by manipulating a map; by keyword search; by selecting search limiting facets (e.g., limit to a given format type); or by combining these options.

Christine Borgman giving keynote address at Data Day 2015

Did you miss Data Day 2015? No worries -- most of the slide presentations and videos of the event are now available online!

At the Data Day 2015 web site you can download the slides directly or click over to YouTube to watch videos of each of the speakers.

Data Day was held at the Li Ka Shing Center of Monday, April 13 and focused on the latest developments that make data sharing easier and advance the progress of reproducible research and data reuse. Attendees heard from Stanford faculty from biomedicine, psychology, sociology, and engineering, as well as from our keynote speaker, Christine Borgman, who is Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA.

Read more about the event at our web site.

Data Day logo

We are pleased to announce that Data Day 2015 will be made available live via BlueJeans!

On the morning of the event, click here to authenticate into BlueJeans using your SUNet ID. This service is only available to individuals with a Stanford ID. Up to 100 people will be able to watch the event from 8:30am to 1:00pm. First come, first served!

Nearly 250 people signed up within 48 hours of the announcement of the event, which will take place April 13, 2015 at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center at Stanford.

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