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Stanford Stories from the Archives

To celebrate the university’s 125th anniversary the Stanford University Archives, Stanford University Libraries, presents Stanford Stories from the Archives, featuring letters, photographs, publications, objects, and ephemera that show the evolution and unique aspects of student life on the Farm. The primary exhibition and three smaller satellite shows will be mounted in Green Library and the Arrillaga Alumni Center.

Screen shot of an index map of an area in Japan. It shows an underlying map with rectangles overlayed, each of which represents a more detailed map of that area.

Index maps, a kind of finding aid for navigating large sets of maps geographically, are now available interactively via EarthWorks. The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) have been publishing digitized maps online for many years, and in the past two years georeferenced maps, along with geospatial data, satellite imagery, and aerial photographs have been made more easily discoverable via EarthWorks, but index maps have posed special challenges. Thanks to cooperation between the staff of the Stanford Geospatial Center and the EarthWorks development team in Digital Library Systems and Services (DLSS), these maps are now more easily discoverable and navigable.

Image of John Wayne paper based disc

Earlier this year the Stanford Media Preservation Lab and Conservation Lab were tasked with figuring out how to playback severely warped paper based disc sound recordings. The recordings in question are from a three disc set titled Man-Talk by Three Great Western Stars and each one-sided disc in the set features a single monologue by John Wayne, Bill Elliott, or Johnny Mack Brown.

The Stanford ePADD team has been invited to demo the software at the Computation + Journalism Symposium 2016. Demonstrations will take place on September 30, 5-7 pm, in the courtyard adjacent to Paul Brest Hall on the Stanford campus.

Soon after, in early October, we will head to New York for our partner meeting, to discuss specifications for version 3.0, which is expected to release in February 2017. New York University has graciously offered to host our two-day meeting.
 
We-tripantu, Cunco, 2014. Hector González de Cunco Photographs

Stanford's libraries house an extensive collection on various aspects of Chilean culture. The personal library of Fernando Alegría, leading exile figure and Stanford professor for over 30 years, gives it in-depth humanities coverage with over 2900 unique titles of chapbooks, first editions and other literary publications. Items are located in the circulating collection with the more rare/unique placed in Special Collections. In addition, the 100 boxes containing Alegria's literary archive document many of the country's socio-political and cultural events before the 1973 coup as well as the exile years. The Hoover Archives also hold several collections from these years.

The Time of the Force Majeure - Helen & Newton Harrison

Today I received a copy of The Time of the Force Majeure: After 45 years, Counterforce is on the Horizon (Munich: Prestel, 2016), a major title on Helen and Newton Harrison, celebrated artists in what has become known as the Eco Art movement. With six critical essays this 464 page retrospective monograph covers their remarkable shared studio practice of forty-five plus years. SUL acquired the Helen & Newton Harrison papers in 2010. The appearance of the Harrisons’ monograph marks an extremely active publication period related to SUL’s more recent acquisitions of artists’ archives.

Lynn Hershman Leeson: Civic Radar (Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2016) was published in conjunction with an exhibition held at three venues over 2014-2016 where materials from the Lynn Hershman-Leeson papers were shown, the ZKM, Museum of Contemporary Art, Karlsruhe, the Deichtorhallen Hamburg/Falckenberg Collection, and the Lehmbruck Museum Duisburg. Two recent monographs draw on the Carolee Schneemann papers. The first is a major monographic treatment, Carolee Schneemann: Unforgiveable (London: Black Dog Pub., 2015), and the second, Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting (Salzburg: Museum der Moderne; Munich: Prestel, 2015), presents an exhibition held at the Museum der Moderne, Salzburg (November 2015-February 2016) and publishes materials from the archive.

Sadly, but on a related artists' and collections' note, I report the recent passing of Nathan Lerner, an extremely important American photographer, curator, museum director, educator, founding member of the Society for Photographic Education, and founder in 1969 of the Visual Studies Workshop (Rochester, New York). SUL is fortunate of have recently acquired a considerable treasure trove of early Visual Studies Workshop materials, which includes approximately 125 titles published by the Visual Studies Workshop Press, an extensive collection of ephemera (103 pieces) related to the early years of the VSW, and over 150 original silver photographs, silkscreen prints, offset lithographic prints, xerographic prints, and photo-etchings from VSW students and faculty. These materials offer a glimpse into the early years of the VSW and will certainly provide the visual material necessary for research and publication on Lyons and the Workshop.

 

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