Blog topic: Web

Transparent Chart of the Heavens

The Stunning Early Infographics and Maps of the 1800s

January 31, 2017
by G. Salim Mohammed

Objects from the David Rumsey Map Collection are featured in Atlas Obscura's Map Monday for January 30, 2017, features maps from John Emslie and James Reynolds.From Atlas Obscura's feature: "Have you ever wondered what the tallest active volcano is? Or wanted to compare the height of mountain peaks and the lengths of rivers around the world?

Logo of the International Image Interoperability Framework

Stanford Libraries introduces new features in SearchWorks to support enhanced access to image collections

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) has introduced new features in its online catalog, SearchWorks, and the Stanford Digital Repository to make it easier for users worldwide to get access to a treasure trove of high resolution digital images.  The basis of these new features is the International Image Interoperability Framework, a global initiative co-founded by SUL to support the creation of a global network of broadly accessible images curated and produced by libraries, museums, archives and galleries to support research, teaching and broad public use.  

Revolution annuelle de la terre autour du soleil. Compose et dessine par H Nicollet. Le texte de les fig. suppl. par E. Soulier. Paris, publie par J. Andriveau-Goujon, Rue du Bac, no. 17, 1850.

Hacking the David Rumsey Center (Part 2)

About this series

Over the next few weeks I will post a series of brief step-by-step "how-to" tutorials on making use of digital resources from the David Rumsey Map Center and Collection, that I presented in my "Hacking Rumsey" talk, presented at the opening events for The David Rumsey Map Center, at Stanford University Library.

We're starting small, with the easiest tools (like the David Rumsey Map Collection MapTab Chrome Browser Plug-in, which I covered in a previous post) that appeal to the most people, first. Eventually we will work our way up through more complex use of the collections and tools available from The Stanford University Library.

logo of the International Internet Preservation Consortium

Reflections on the 2016 IIPC General Assembly and Web Archiving Conference

May 12, 2016
by Nicholas Taylor

In keeping with shallow tradition, it's taken me a few weeks to collect my thoughts on the recently-concluded IIPC General Assembly and Web Archiving Conference, hosted this year by the National and University Library of Iceland. In the wake of last year's meeting, I speculated on what developments in web archiving we might together effect in the year ahead (now behind). Nearly a year later, that conceit provides a convenient jumping-off point for reflecting on how it all went, where we might go from here, and the tremendous amount of work to do in our one remaining collective month before the anniversary of that post. :)

screenshot from Exploring the Canadian Political Interest Group and Political Parties Web Sphere

Resources for research using web archives

March 1, 2016
by Nicholas Taylor

Since our collaboration with political science researchers using web archives to understand the 2014 U.S. congressional elections, we've seen (and, hopefully, helped foster) growing interest in web archives as primary source material. This trend parallels a similar refocusing by other web archiving programs toward enhancing access services and facilitating research use. The maturity and the variety of these efforts, as well as the accumulating body of resulting research, provide an expanding list of references with which to orient and entice prospective researchers to the potential of working with web archives.

#ethics @ #webarc15

Questions of ethics at Web Archives 2015

December 17, 2015
by Nicholas Taylor

A welcome complement to the lately growing number of web archiving-specific events, the inaugural Web Archives: Capture, Curate, Analyze conference (tweet stream) brought together an eclectic crowd of researchers, instructors, students, archivists, librarians, developers, and others interested in web archiving. A novel mixture of institutions was also represented - some active principally through IIPC, many more associated with the SAA Web Archiving Roundtable and/or Archive-It Partner communities, and still others who I'd not yet encountered in these more established, practitioner-centric fora.

Echoing the sentiments of other participants, I was impressed and inspired both by the diversity of perspectives and the excitement for moving web archiving forward. As befitting such a group, the schedule and hallway conversations crossed a wide array of topics. Running through it all, though, questions of ethics seemed to be a persistent subject. I'll highlight three areas of ethical concern that stood out for me.

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