Blog topic: Web

A stack of newspapers

Why I use a feed reader (and why you should, too!)

January 16, 2014
by Ray Heigemeir

Using a feed reader is an efficient way of staying current on topics of interest.

RSS (Rich Site Summary, or Real Simple Syndication) is a mechanism by which a digital information source sends out links to newly added content. A feed reader lets me gather, organize, and edit these various streams of new content links in a single, user-friendly interface (I use Feedly).  When I subscribe to a feed, new content is automatically sent to my feed reader as soon as it is made available, 24/7.  Oh, and it’s free!

Open tape reel from Gerhard Samuel Collection, ARS.0049

How accessible are our media collections?

During the fall of 2013, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) convened a working group to investigate the current state of access to audio and moving image materials held within its various collections, notably rare materials within its different special collections departments, along with those held at the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 

Following many weeks of investigation, the Media Access Working Group (MAWG) produced a report in December 2013 outlining its findings, along with various recommendations to help tackle the issues discovered. The group considered issues relating to use cases, copyright status, available technologies - including media streaming, and content usage. 

"Green plant in its pot in three different phases of growth" by palomaironique

Coming changes to the website

August 6, 2013
by Ray Heigemeir

The library website continues to grow, and with growth comes change. We are happy to announce that early next week some high priority changes to the site's architecture will go live.

Cartoon of a UX person listening to many stories. (Illustration by Calvin C. Chan).

A user-centered approach to developing digital collection websites

February 7, 2013

Over the past two years, the Digital Library Systems and Services department at SUL has developed a user-centered approach to building websites.  Our methodology involves early and iterative feedback from the primary audience of SUL’s web resources – academic researchers.  The intended result is web applications that help users achieve their research goals while at the same time increasing the efficiency of the software development process (thus, lowering the time to development and the cost).  

Online chat reference, events and more added to the library website in October 2012

November 14, 2012

The new library website has been in place for over two months now, and the team has been busy receiving feedback, fixing bugs, adding new features, and planning ahead.  We have established a support contract with Chapter Three, the same firm that engineered the site initially, to provide us with a fixed number of support hours each month.  Within that allocation of support hours we first tackle critical bug fixes and then attempt to add new features to enable better service and to support content creators in their work.

Pages

RSS
accessibilityaccessprivsarrow-circle-rightaskus-chataskus-librarianbarsblogsclosecoffeecomputercomputersulcontactsconversationcopierelectricaloutleteventsexternal-linkfacebook-circlegroupstudyhoursindividualinterlibrarynewsnextoffcampusopenlateoutdoorpeoplepolicypreviousprinterprojectsquietreservesscannersearchstudysupportingtabletourstwitter-circleworking