Blogs

bX Recommender trial added to SFX (Find it at Stanford links)

January 17, 2014

bX Recommender logoA trial of bX Recommender has been added to SFX (the Find it at Stanford links) maintained by the Stanford Libraries.  Thanks to Alexis Manheim and Holly Thomasen for their work to customize this tool for SUL.

bX Recommender is a service developed by ExLibris to work with SFX to help researchers discover additional relevant articles. Recommendations are based on the usage of millions of researchers around the globe. Starting with the article the user is looking at, bX Recommender checks what other articles were used together with that article and then displays a list of other relevant articles on the SFX results page.

A stack of newspapers

Why I use a feed reader (and why you should, too!)

January 16, 2014
by Ray Heigemeir

Using a feed reader is an efficient way of staying current on topics of interest.

RSS (Rich Site Summary, or Real Simple Syndication) is a mechanism by which a digital information source sends out links to newly added content. A feed reader lets me gather, organize, and edit these various streams of new content links in a single, user-friendly interface (I use Feedly).  When I subscribe to a feed, new content is automatically sent to my feed reader as soon as it is made available, 24/7.  Oh, and it’s free!

Digital signage in the libraries

January 15, 2014

The Stanford Libraries has utilized digital signage for many years. We have always looked to move from the monotonous static systems of the past to a communicative system that was more dynamic and interactive. There are many digital signage solutions available on the market – both open source and commercial – that have the features and functionality for building a robust digital signage system, but none that offers the features and personal touch like Oalla.

Open tape reel from Gerhard Samuel Collection, ARS.0049

How accessible are our media collections?

During the fall of 2013, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) convened a working group to investigate the current state of access to audio and moving image materials held within its various collections, notably rare materials within its different special collections departments, along with those held at the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 

Following many weeks of investigation, the Media Access Working Group (MAWG) produced a report in December 2013 outlining its findings, along with various recommendations to help tackle the issues discovered. The group considered issues relating to use cases, copyright status, available technologies - including media streaming, and content usage. 

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