Blogs

Fixes and enhancements to the library website in March

April 11, 2014

Each month we tackle some small changes to the library website. Following are some updates of note from March.

Sharing links to posts on social media now pulls the image from the post

When you link to a library blog post on social media, the image from the blog post will now display in your share. For example, you can see below how this blog post about Kurt Cobain shows up on Facebook when shared.

Facebook post showing a recent blog entry from the library website

Grover Sales Collection at Stanford in Washington

The Archive of Recorded Sound recently collaborated with the Bing Stanford in Washington program to provide digitized images from the Archive's Grover Sales Collection (ARS.0016) for an evening event at the program in late January which served to launch both a new arts track at Bing Stanford in Washington, and provide students from both Stanford and nearby Duke Ellington School of the Arts with an insight into the role jazz played in African American history and civil rights through the early to middle part of the 20th century.  The event  featured a display of enlarged wall mounted images of Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, and Ethel Waters, sourced from the Grover Sales Collection, digitized from 35mm negative slides. Grover Sales (1920-2004), a Bay Area author, jazz critic, and teacher, who regularly taught jazz history here at Stanford, amassed the image portion of his collection from various sources for use during his classes.  

Research data lost to the sands of time

April 9, 2014
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

[Originally posted on Free Government Information blog] Here's an interesting article, not on link rot (a topic FGI has been tracking for some time), but on *data rot*. In a recent article in Current Biology, researchers examined the availability of data from 516 studies between 2 and 22 years old. They found the following:

  • that the odds of a data set being reported as extant fell by 17% per year;
  • Broken e-mails and obsolete storage devices were the main obstacles to data sharing
  • Policies mandating data archiving at publication are clearly needed

Stephen Henry Schneider

Growth of a climate expert

Dr. Steve Schneider talks about how he became interested in earth systems and in atmospheric research in this excerpt from an interview done by Gray Thompson in 1992

“I was actually born in New York City. I didn’t live in it until I went back to Columbia University 17 years later. And I grew up in [Woodmere,] Long Island. And what I remember enjoying a lot about Long Island before the developers hacked down all the woods was getting dropped off in a square mile of woods which I used to call “the deep, dark forest…” and run around and just enjoy streams and nature.

Stephen Henry Schneider

The Stephen H. Schneider Collection

The University Archives recently completed a CLIR-funded project to process the papers of the late Dr. Stephen Schneider. Steve was a professor who taught Bio 15N, Bio 147, ES 10, ES 15 and ES 179, among other classes. Steve was very well-liked by students and collaborators alike per his student and peer evaluations. Steve grew up on Long Island and attended Columbia University, where he received his bachelor’s, master’s and PhD.

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