Blogs

DRAFT of wire frame for ePADD program.

ePADD - NHPRC Innovation Grant underway

October 23, 2013
by Glynn Edwards

SUL’s Special Collections received an Innovation Grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission to develop a software program (ePADD) for processing and making email archives discoverable. The end goal is to produce an open-source tool that will allow repositories and individuals to interact with email archives before and after they have been transferred to a repository. It would consist of four modules, each based on a different functional activity: Processing (arrangement and description), Appraisal (collection development), Discovery (online via the web), and Delivery (access).  

The project website was launched in August 2013 and lists: project goals, work plan, team, and collaborators. A twitter feed for the project was just launched although project updates and news will primarily be posted iSpecial Collections Unbound.  

San Francisco street scene

SDR Deposit of the Week: Ordinary images in the service of extraordinary possibilities

Some of the items most recently deposited to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) include thousands of images that are nothing short of, well, ordinary. For instance, in the Names 100 Dataset, you can download a folder containing 80,000 small images depicting the faces of ordinary people. In another case, there are millions of snapshots of San Francisco street scenes and buildings. Each image is notable for its lack of distinction.  It’s as if anyone could have captured these images using their smartphone. And that is precisely the point.

SDR Deposit of the Week: Getting Techie with the Blume Center

October 15, 2013
by Amy E. Hodge

What do you get when you combine 14 library staff, the John A. Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering Technical Reports, the SDR self-deposit interface, and pizza? A Deposit-a-thon, of course!

A lot of valuable research done on Stanford's campus is published as part of technical reports, and as valued research output there is no better place to preserve these -- and make them easily accessible to the world -- than through the Stanford Digital Repository.

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