Blogs

Photo of packaging for software called "Appointment Calendar Plus"

Born-digital collections opened for research in 2022

November 30, 2022
by Annie Schweikert

Special Collections receives a large amount of born-digital material every year—this year, more than 10 terabytes and counting. Special Collections and Born Digital Preservation Lab (BDPL) staff work together to image and process the digital material we receive, with the ultimate goal of making this material available through Stanford’s catalog. Here are some highlights of the digital materials we’ve opened for research over the past year.

Cours d'étude de fils; African commemorative cloth, Bakst czarevitch costume

Special, Unique, and Rare! Textiles and Fashion on Nov. 8

October 25, 2022
by Sarah B Sussman

The Humanities and Area Studies curators are organizing a monthly pop-up exhibit series highlighting the depth and diversity of Stanford Libraries' collections.

Come join us next Tuesday, November 8, from 2-4pm in the Hohbach Seminar Room (126) to see what we've selected relating to TEXTILES and FASHION

How have fashion and textiles been used throughout history by people to express themselves, advance technology, influence labor practices, and make political statements? We'll have examples from around the world - stop by to be inspired!

photo of Kyungmi Chun

Farewell, Kyungmi!

October 19, 2022
by Dr Regan Murphy Kao

Kyungmi Chun is retiring after almost sixteen years of service to Stanford Libraries and its users.  When she joined Stanford in 2007 as Korean Studies Librarian, the Korean Collection was in its inception, having only been established in 2005.  During her time at Stanford, Kyungmi built a world-class collection from ground-up.  Her work has been an integral part in the growth of the Korean Studies program at Stanford.  She has supported the faculty and students, especially graduate students, in Korean Studies.  Previously, Kyungmi served as the Korean Studies Librarian at the University of

New exhibit in the Bowes Art & Architecture Library - Contours of an Invisible City

October 17, 2022
by Katharine A Keller

Contours of an Invisible City envisions Rome as a multiverse of sorts – an ancient metropolis teeming with phantasms and histories. Pairing guidebooks from the 16th-20th centuries with a new series of photographs by non-fiction photographer Kieran Dodds, the exhibition invites reflection on the palimpsest of invisible cities that are Rome.

Curated by Christian Gonzalez Ho, 2nd-year PhD student in art history.

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