Data Management Services

Stanford University Libraries is available to assist you with your data managment needs. Consulting with us can help you better understand how to:

  • Prepare your data management plan
  • Get access to campus computing resources for storing your data
  • Determine the best ways to manage your data
  • Help you share your data
  • Preserve your data for the long term

Contact us at ask-data-services@lists.stanford.edu for questions or help or visit the Data Management Services website.

Recent Stanford Digital Repository news

Co-expression of CDT1A and SOL2 in Arabidopsis thaliana seedling leaf

SDR Deposit of the Week: Video tutorials for 4D visualization

May 15, 2017
by Amy E. Hodge

Many researchers rely on open source software for data analysis, but lack of documentation on how to use the software can sometimes be an issue. In these situations, it's up to someone in the community to step up and create better resources to help people learn how to get the most out of these tools.

Stanford biology undergrad Nathan Cho found himself in just this situation recently while working on his honors thesis. Cho's project involved studying how stem cell development in plants affects the timing of the cell cycle, the process by which cells grow and divide. Analysis of his microscopy images required him to use open source software from the Max Plank Institute called MorphoGraphX.

Johan de Witt

A better home for your scholarly work: the Stanford Digital Repository

April 25, 2017
by Amy E. Hodge

What do you do when a Google search for an article title only returns one dead link and two advertisements? And yet you have this article in front of you so you know it exists? If you want to cite that article in a research paper but you don't have all the publication information to create the citation, you do the obvious thing.

You contact a librarian.

A student at Berkeley recently contacted Stanford Libraries, hoping that we could provide her with citation information for an article about Johan de Witt (the dashing gentleman in the image above) that she knew had come out of Stanford. The URL where she had accessed the article was at web.stanford.edu, but, sadly, this link no longer worked. She hoped someone at the library could help her identify the publisher of this article.

DMP Tool / Amy Hodge