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SUL Collection Development Policy

Library Collections and Resources: Linguistics
Selector: John Rawlings
Date 9/12/05

I. Programmatic Information

Linguistics Department
CSLI
Stanford Language Center

The Department of Linguistics is a vibrant center of research and teaching, with 20 faculty members, over 40 graduate students, and a lively undergraduate major. The range of languages studied is diverse and the scope of active research and teaching is broad, including acquisition, computational linguistics, historical linguistics, morphology, phonetics, phonology, pragmatics, psycholinguistics, semantics, sociolinguistics, syntax, typology and variation.

Portions of the research agenda of the Stanford Language Center are also supported by the selector and Green library collections: second language acquisition, literacy learning, and language-related policy development and research, and the teaching of “uncommonly-taught” languages.

Language interests in the departments of Anthropological Sciences and CASA are also covered by the linguistics selector.

II. Coordination & Cooperative Information

• The Linguistics bibliographer selects descriptive material on all the world languages and dialects except for those few major languages covered by Stanford’s several area/language curators including, e.g., Arabic, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hebrew, Russian, inter alia.

• Responsibility for Indo-European is shared with the Classics selector.

• The Math/Computer Science selector has primary responsibility for mathematical and computational linguistics.

• The Education selector is responsible for language teaching and learning.

• The East Asian selector is responsible for Chinese and Japanese language material.

• Arabic language material is the responsibility of the Middle East selector.

• The Russian/East European selector is responsible for Russian language material.

• Most African imprints arrive via gathering plans of the Africa selector.

III. Subject & Language Modifiers

Geographical: No limitation so far as theoretical or descriptive works within the language guidelines below. Most acquisitions are US and Western European imprints.
Chronological : No limitations.
Language : About 80% of all purchases (books and periodicals) are English language titles. All acquisitions require at least a title page in a Roman script.

IV. Description of Material Collected

Types of material collected : The entire realm of published linguistics literature, and other material needed to support short or long-term research projects, including dissertations and electronic corpora

Publication date : Primarily current imprints.

Conspectus of the Field: Linguistics (adapted from RLG Conspectus)

Ethnolinguistics 4/4F
Psycholinguistics 4/4F
Sociolinguistics 4/4F
Language Planning 4/4F
Study and Teaching see Education CD statement
History/Biography 4/4F
Semiotics 4/4F with the language/area selectors
Non-Verbal Communication 4/4F
Philosophy, Psychology, Origin of Language 4/4F
Bilingualism/Multilingualism 4/4F with Education, see its statement
Linguistics Methodology, Analysis 4/4F
Applied Linguistics 3/3F with Education, see its statement
Mathematical/Computational Linguistics see Math/Comp Science CD statement
Historical Linguistics/Diachronics 4/4F Classics for Greek and Roman
Indo-European 4/4F with Classics
Descriptive Linguistics, Synchronics 4/4F
Theory of Grammar 4/4F
Comparative Grammar 4/4F
Writing Systems, Origin of Alphabet 4/4F
Phonology 4/4F
Morphology 4/4F
Syntax 4/4F
Stylistics 4/4F
Composition see Education statement
Rhetoric see Communication statement
Semantics 4/4F with Philosophy
Lexicography 4/4F
Dialectology and Linguistic Geography 4/4F
Translating and Interpreting 3/3F
Translating and Interpreting—Machine Translation see Math/Comp Science statement Prosody 3/3F
Metrics 3/3F
American Indian languages 4/4F
Mixed language. Pidgins and Creoles 4/4W
Artificial and Universal Languages 3/3W

Last modified: January 15, 2009

Stanford UCB coordination

LINGUISTICS

Reformat of version 1, Feb. 23, 2009 (revised May 10 2012, SK)

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Research Library Cooperative Program: Linguistics

University of California, Berkeley & Stanford University

I. Introduction:

A. General.

The combined Linguistics collections of the library systems at the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford offer an extraordinary intellectual resource of major research value not only to their students and faculty but to the scholarly community in general. It aims to extend and deepen the collecting strengths of our libraries by focusing acquisitions and development efforts in complementary areas as much as possible. While both institutions are committed to acquiring materials to support general study and teaching on their campuses, we also acknowledge the importance of sharing responsibility for in-depth acquisition at the research level.

Each institution commits to saving harmless the parties to this agreement in the case of fiscal duress or necessary programmatic change by:

a. notifying the other parties as soon as possible about any problems which would affect that institution’s ability to fulfill its obligation,

b. maintaining the level of spending on the program expressed in the agreement for a period of twelve months following notification, in order to enable the other parties to adjust their programs and their own spending levels to the changes circumstances; and,

Each institution will notify the other parties if it wishes any change in their areas of collecting as defined by this agreement.

The future for cooperation is challenging for linguistics as published works are increasingly offered in digital formats and we increasingly choose to purchase material in e-format only. (See the comment for Section V: Digital Resources.) Springer Verlag ebooks and journals are already licensed by both libraries and investigation of Brill and De Gryuter ebooks licenses is taking place

B. Programmatic Information.

1. Stanford.

The range of languages studied is diverse and the scope of active research and teaching is broad, including acquisition, computational linguistics, historical linguistics, morphology, phonetics, phonology, pragmatics, psycholinguistics, semantics, sociolinguistics, syntax, typology and variation. Detailed information about the Linguistics dept. is at http://linguistics.stanford.edu/.

The library’s collecting program is described in a Collection Development Policy. It is important to note that those relatively few languages that fall withing the purview of the Library Language/Area curators (Arabic, Hebrew, Romance, Slavic, most Germanic, Chinese/Japanese/Korean, etc) are the responsibility of the language/area curators. The reader must consult the language/area curators’ collecting policies and cooperative agreements. The Classics and Linguistics selector share an interest in Indo-European studies. Sanskrit in particular is covered by the Linguistics selector while Greek, Latin, and other ancient languages are in the bailiwick of the Classics selector.

2. Berkeley.

When the Berkeley Linguistics Department was founded in 1901, it was the first Department of Linguistics in the Western Hemisphere. Its original mission was the recording and describing of unwritten languages, especially Native American languages spoken in California and elsewhere in the United States. While field linguistics has continued to be a mainstay, the department has over the decades acquired other areas of expertise as well, and is currently one of the most diverse departments of Linguistics in the country, with specialities in phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, cognitive linguistics, and historical linguistics; areal specialties, in addition to American Indian languages, include the languages of Africa, Southeast Asia, Australia and the Caucasus.

There are at present 14 faculty and 5 retired professors associated with the department, as well as a number of distinguished linguists in other departments who are affiliated with Linguistics. With over 50 graduate students in progress toward the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, Berkeley linguists remain committed to the empirical, historical, and theoretical study of linguistic structure within a broad linguistic, cultural, and cognitive context.

II. Collections and Collecting

We are taking both a publisher/series approach and a geographical approach focusing on core areas of current acquisitions. The responsible library will maintain current levels of acquisitions and standing orders for monographic series from these publishers and will negotiate changes or expansions thereof. We have not yet assigned responsibility for all the target publishers and series.

SUL_yes = Stanford Library currently subscribes to print

SUL_no = Stanford does not subscribe or has cancelled standing order/subscription

Amsterdam studies in the theory and history of linguistic science. Series III, Studies in the history of the language sciences--(SiHoLS)  SUL_yes CKEY: 494117;

ISSN: 0304-0720

John Benjamins

Amsterdam studies in the theory and history of linguistic science. Series IV, Current issues in linguistic theory -- (CILT) SUL_yes CKEY: 9524279;

ISSN: 0304-0763

John Benjamins

Approaches to translation studies SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

 

Rodopi

Benjamins translation library --(BTL) SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

ISSN: 0929-7316

John Benjamins

Constructional approaches to language SUL_yes CKEY: 5723240

ISSN: 1573-594X

John Benjamins

Creole language library --(CLL) SUL_yes CKEY: 496065

ISSN: 0920-9026

John Benjamins

Gesture Studies--(GS) SUL_no

ISSN: 1874-6829

John Benjamins

Impact, studies in language and society SUL_yes CKEY: 4298594

ISSN: 1385-7908

John Benjamins

Language acquisition & language disorders SUL_yes  CKEY: 3391899

ISSN: 0925-0123

John Benjamins

Linguisticae investigationes. Supplementa -- (LIS) SUL_yes CKEY: 490342

ISSN: 0165-7569

John Benjamins

Linguistik aktuell / Linguistics today SUL_yes CKEY: 461067

ISSN: 0166-0829

John Benjamins

Studies in bilingualism SUL_yes CKEY: 3382532

ISSN: 0928-1533

John Benjamins

Studies in corpus linguistics SUL_yes CKEY: 3962431

ISSN: 1388-0373

John Benjamins

Studies in discourse and grammar SUL_yes CKEY: 3513940

ISSN: 0928-8929

John Benjamins

Studies in functional and structural linguistics SUL_yes CKEY: 3831517

ISSN: 0165-7712

John Benjamins

Studies in language companion series SUL_yes CKEY: 491003

ISSN: 0165-7763

John Benjamins

Terminology and lexicography research and practice SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

ISSN: 1388-8455

John Benjamins

Trends in language acquisition research -- (TILAR) SUL_yes CKEY: 4758761

ISSN: 1569-0644

John Benjamins

Typological studies in language -- (TSL) SUL_yes CEKY: 460893

ISSN: 0167-7373

John Benjamins

Language in performance SUL_yes CKEY: 3443257

ISSN:0939-9399

Tübingen : Narr

Lexicographica. Series maior SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

ISSN:0175-9264

Niemeyer

Linguistische Arbeiten (Max Niemeyer Verlag) SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

ISSN:0344-6727

Niemeyer

Reihe Germanistische Linguistik SUL_yes CKEY: 449855

ISSN 0344-6778

Niemeyer

Tübinger Beiträge zur Linguistik SUL_yes CKEY: 477925

ISSN:0564-7959

Tübingen : Narr

Tübinger Beiträge zur Linguistik. Series A, Language development SUL_no

ISSN:0939-7973

Tübingen : Narr

LINCOM all publications in series+++

 

LINCOM Europa

LOT International Series SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

 

Utrecht LOT

Philologische Studien und Quellen SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

 

Erich Schmidt Verlag

Topics in English linguistics SUL_yes CKEY: 3117397

 

Mouton de Gruyter,

Trends in linguistics. Studies and monographs SUL_yes CKEY: 406911

 

Mouton de Gruyter,

 +++LINCOM

Stanford has cancelled subscriptions to the following LINCOM series:

LINCOM Languages of the World/Text Collection (LW/T) SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Linguistic research forum SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in acquisition SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in Asian Linguistics (LSASL) SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in Caucasian Linguistics (LSCL) SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in coursebooks SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in English Linguistics SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in handbooks SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in Indo-European Linguistics (LSIEL) SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in pragmatics SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in sociolinguistics SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

LINCOM Studies in Theoretical Linguistics (LSTL) SUL_no CANCELLED (5.26.2009)

Geographical Cooperation: Linguistic studies of indigenous and threatened languages

N.B. Grammars, and dictionaries for indigenous languages may be collected aggressively by each library. However, in general,

  • Berkeley library will rely on Stanford for in depth collection of linguistics studies, grammars, and dictionaries for indigenous languages of Latin America, South Asia (Indic, Dravidian)*, and Pidgins and Creoles. *Only Berkeley South/Southeast Asian library collects material in South Asian vernacular languages)

  • Stanford library will rely on Berkeley for in depth collection of linguistics studies, grammars, and dictionaries for indigenous languages of Oceania (Indo-Pacific, Australian), Middle East (Semitic, Iranian, and Turkic), and Africa (Niger-Kordofanian, Nilo-Sahran, Khoisan, some Afro-Asiatic)

  1. Shayee Khanaka, Middle Eastern Collections Librarian, UCB, <skhanaka@library.berkeley.edu>
  2. Jan Carter, US/UK/Commonwealth Librarian, UCB, < jcarter@library.berkeley.edu>
  3. John Rawlings, Philosophy Bibliographer, < rawlings@stanford.edu>
  4. James H. Spohrer, Librarian for the Germanic Collections, UCB, < jspohrer@library.berkeley.edu>

III. Library Services:

Faculty and graduate students should register with the Research Library Cooperative Program (RLCP) to borrow Library material through the RLCP's document delivery service. Additionally, the University of California / Stanford University Reciprocal Services Program (RSP) provides eligible Stanford users with the same on-site access and borrowing privileges as are accorded their counterparts at each of the U.C. campus general libraries.

IV. Evaluation

Linguistics  librarians will continue to evaluate the needs of the clientele at each institution and adjust cooperative collections and services to meet any changes in the academic programs.  Regular communication between the staff of each institution will inform concerning serial cancellations, changes in acquisition processes, and funding fluctuations.

V. Digital Resources:

The restrictive access policies of some database providers and restricted access that scholars may be subject to from public terminals in both libraries is inadequate to allow rational sharing of many digital resources such as corpora and indexes/abstracts. E-books and e-journals also are not feasibly shared between campuses.

Linguistics  librarians will continue to evaluate the needs of the clientele at each institution and adjust cooperative collections and services to meet any changes in the academic programs.  Regular communication between the staff of each institution will inform concerning serial cancellations, changes in acquisition processes, and funding fluctuations.

VII. Conclusion:

As already emphasized cooperation is challenging for linguistics because published works are increasingly offered in digital formats and we increasingly choose to purchase material in e-format only. (See the comment for Section V: Digital Resources.) Springer Verlag ebooks and journals are already licensed by both libraries and investigation of Brill and De Gryuter ebooks licenses is taking place. There is virtually no room for rationalization of journal subscriptions because almost all core US and Euro journals are online.

Appendices:

 

 




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