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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Painted Green Library Bing Wing stairwell leading up to the David Rumsey Map Center.

"One of the World's Great Map Collections," a quote taken in part from the title of an article published by National Geographic on the newly opened David Rumsey Map Center.

"The new David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford University feels like a secret clubhouse for map lovers. To get there, you pass through a nondescript door in the library and climb two flights of stairs. But it’s not just any stairwell: The walls are painted floor to ceiling with colorful maps.

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Concierge Keys

For these Concierge sessions, join the development team from ePADD, open source software developed by SUL’s Special Collections and University Archives that uses machine learning and natural language processing to support the appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of historical email archives.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Lockss logo

Communities using the LOCKSS Software have collaboratively passed an important milestone and are now preserving over 1000 “long tail” journal publishers, smaller publishers who have ten or fewer journals. Content from these publishers are most at-risk for loss, making preservation vital to guarantee future access to the material for research and teaching.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Chinese Graves screen shot

A faculty-led project developed by the Stanford Libraries' Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR) was recently featured in Stanford Report, which describes it thus: “...a digital humanities project led by Stanford historian Tom Mullaney is creating a map that illustrates the ongoing and multifaceted impact of funeral reform and grave relocation in China. In the last 15 years, grave relocation has been taking place in China on a massive scale. To date, some 15 million deceased people's remains have been moved.” CIDR developers David McClure and Karl Grossner, together with a small SUL team, have been working on the project with Professor Mullaney over the past 18 months, and Mullaney presented a synopsis of the project at the Stanford Libraries’ annual donor event in October, 2015.

Read Stanford scholar uses digital tools to track grave relocation in China.
See also the Libraries' project page: Grave Reform in China.

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