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Wednesday, March 15, 2017

In an article featured in The Dish, the University Archives was recently acknowledged for its Stanford Alumni Legacy Project. Begun in 2014, the project focuses on collecting, preserving, and providing long-term access to student materials created by Stanford alumni during their time at Stanford.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Terraforming: Art and Engineering in the Sacramento Watershed opens Thursday, January 26, 2017, with reception from 3-5 in the Green Library Rotunda, Stanford University - Top: Helen and Newton Harrison perform Sacramento Meditations at the San Francisco Art Institute in 1977. Harrison Papers, Stanford University Libraries. Bottom image: Folsom Dam on the American River. CA State Library. Postcard design E. Fischbach

Exhibition opening reception. Terraforming examines the history of freshwater in the Sacramento Watershed, juxtaposing materials from the archive of California artists Helen and Newton Harrison with materials from local, state, and national archives that document the development of water resources in California’s Central Valley and the West.

Reception: January 26, 3pm - 5pm, Green Library Rotunda. The reception is open to the general public and admission is free.

See: Stanford Libraries Special Collections Exhibits.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Mario Paci conducting

The conductor, composer, and pianist, Mario Paci, lived the last 25 years of his life in Shanghai after being a touring pianist in Europe and Asia. He composed 8 songs in a late Romantic style, which are in manuscript at Stanford Libraries Special Collections. The songs will be performed for the first time in over 100 years by soprano Christine Abraham and pianist Laura Dahl at Toyon Hall for the opening of an exhibit on Paci on January 23 at 4 pm.

SUL Rosette

“War tore the sisters’ father away forever. Sixty years later, a hidden memoir brought his spirit back to them,” Sam Scott reported in Stanford Magazine.  “Carry On — a copy of which the family donated to Stanford and which the University Archives published online this year — is not really a diary. It’s essentially an embedded reporter’s account of life in Bilibid, where Lt. James Robb, ’31, JD ’34, ended up in October 1942, emaciated by ‘seven months of starvation.’”

Read the entire article, "Lost and Found" in the Stanford Magazine.

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