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Presentations

Presentations

Presentations from the Lighting the Way Forum on February 10, 2020 were organized into five groupings or themes, most with dedicated question and answers sessions. 

  • Introductory presentations: Information about the the Lighting the Way Project and the Lighting the Way Forum.
  • The Evolving Systems Ecosystem: What software and other systems do we use to make archival discovery and delivery possible, and how is that changing within institutional contexts?
  • Networks and the Big Picture: What issues are impacting archives and libraries at the level of the sector, consortia, or beyond, related to discovery and delivery?
  • Ethical, Legal, and Cultural Concerns: How have factors like privacy, cultural protocols, copyright, and others impacted our ability to address archival discovery and delivery, on a technical, operational, or strategic level?
  • Impacts on Public Services and Outreach: How does archival discovery and delivery fit within the front-line work of library and archives workers focused on reference, outreach, public service, and community needs?

All presentations were livestreamed and recorded, and speakers consented to having their recordings and presentation files shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works (CC-BY-NC-ND) License. All presentation videos are viewable with or without open captions.


Introductory presentations

Information about the the Lighting the Way Project and the Lighting the Way Forum.

Welcome, logistics, and acknowlegements

Mark Matienzo and Tom Cramer, Stanford Libraries
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/mv885mk1216

The Lighting the Way Project and National Forum

Mark A. Matienzo and Camille Villa, Stanford Libraries
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/dv339rx4339

This presentation will provide an overview of the Lighting the Way project and National Forum, including goals and outcomes, the structure of the event, and more.

The Evolving Systems Ecosystem

What software and other systems do we use to make archival discovery and delivery possible, and how is that changing within institutional contexts?

Developing an integrated technical infrastructure for archives at NC State

Trevor Thornton, North Carolina State University Libraries
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/qb052kj0451

An overview of applications developed to facilitate management of archival collections and archival research at NC State, with a particular focus on interoperability.

We Are In It Now: Persevering in the Evolving Systems Ecosystem

Lori Myers-Steele, Berea College
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/gx295qj8615

Five years ago, Berea College’s Special Collections and Archives had no real system for archival discovery and delivery. Today, after creating a systems ecosystem (with various systems such as Archon, Preservica, Universal Access, and others), our biggest challenge is determining how to effectively integrate the systems to work together as a coordinated whole. This presentation will focus on past migration work at Berea as well as upcoming migrations that will, hopefully, create an improved and more tightly integrated system for archival delivery and discovery.

Vertical collaboration in a digital collections ecosystem

Kim Pham, University of Denver
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/hq192ky4619

This talk will cover the design of our modular digital collections ecosystem and how management is distributed across multiple library partners. It will go over the design process, challenges and successes, and current efforts to build community around this approach.

Taking the Plunge: When Improving Access and Discoverability Means Walking Away from Your Existing Systems and Starting Over

Anna Trammell, Pacific Lutheran University
Persistent URL: https://purl.stanford.edu/pr103tf2767

The Pacific Lutheran University Archives and Special Collections is currently in the process of moving from several systems to a single collection management system. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges we faced with our previous systems, how we selected a new system, and how we are managing the project with a very small staff.

Networks and the Big Picture

What issues are impacting archives and libraries at the level of the sector, consortia, or beyond, related to discovery and delivery?

Toward a National Archival Finding Aid Network

Adrian Turner, California Digital Library
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/kv589hn5123

This presentation will report on outcomes from "Toward a National Archival Finding Aid Network" (NAFAN) -- a one-year (2018-2019) planning initiative convened by the CDL, with the participation of representatives from multiple regional finding aid aggregations. Many aggregators across the country struggle to find sufficient resources to update their platforms and engage with some of the most promising advances in the field. With crucial funding support provided by the IMLS under the provisions of LSTA and administered in California by the State Librarian, the NAFAN initiative proposed to explore the creation of a national archival finding aid network. The initiative provided participants opportunities to discuss and test the original premise: by pooling resources and establishing co-development partnerships, we believe we can address our individual challenges collectively, thereby extending the capabilities, breadth, and depth of existing aggregations. The presentation will highlight the action plan produced from the 2018-2019 project activities -- and will report on work currently being undertaken by the planning initiative participants to formalize and initiate work on action plan.

A look at trends in academic libraries: are archives lighting the way, or left in the dark?

Merrilee Proffitt, OCLC Research Library Partnership
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/qt647gg7872

Regardless of how special our collections are, it is important to not lose sight of larger trends in information management and discovery.  Drawing on work from OCLC Research, this presentation will look at trends in collection management, user studies and resource description.

Ethical, Legal, and Cultural Concerns

How have factors like privacy, cultural protocols, copyright, and others impacted our ability to address archival discovery and delivery, on a technical, operational, or strategic level?

Student work, copyright and FERPA: how what you don't know might FERP-YA

Amanda Whitmire, Harold A. Miller Library, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/bg405cn7261

In this presentation, I review how copyright and FERPA relate to curation of student work. I explore these constraints through the lens of a collection of undergraduate student research papers from the marine biology library at Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University.

Embargoed information: (imperfect) approaches to ethical archival access in Cuba

T-Kay Sangwand, UCLA Library
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/wp525cy3737

This presentation will discuss the ethical and legal challenges as well as concrete approaches to providing archival access in Cuba. These challenges and approaches may be relevant to other global north/south collaborations or in locations with limited internet access. 

Feeling Around a Dimly Lit Room: Towards a Virtual Reading Room

Greg Cram, The New York Public Library
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/yv187wv5370

The New York Public Library has been digitizing its collections for decades in an effort to make its myriad collections more broadly available to researchers. Through careful copyright research, clearance and an appropriate appetite for risk, NYPL has made nearly 900,000 items accessible to the open web. Despite these efforts, many of NYPL’s audio and moving image collections remain difficult for remote researchers to access without having to travel to New York City. That’s because copyright in audio and moving images collections can be significantly more complex than the copyright in a photo or manuscript.  To address this issue, NYPL has launched a multi-discipline task force. One of the group’s hypotheses is that a “virtual reading room” could be used to give access to remote researchers for private study, scholarship or research while complying with copyright law and NYPL’s privacy values. This session will give you a peak into NYPL’s early thoughts on how to make its audio and moving image collections that remain protected by copyright available to remote users.

Impacts on Public Services and Outreach

How does archival discovery and delivery fit within the front-line work of library and archives workers focused on reference, outreach, public service, and community needs?

San Bernardino County Historical Archives and The Arrowhead Online Portal

Genevieve Preston, San Bernardino County Historical Archives
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/kq234ry7019

This talk describes our use of Eloquent and outreach used to increase use of the San Bernardino County Historical Archives.

Aeon Office Hours & Open Archives Sessions

Daisy Muralles, University of California, Santa Barbara
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/nd901zk5193

Looking beyond the service desk at UCSB Library's Special Research Collections to increase archival discovery and research engagement with the collections.

Pulling the Door Open Together: Collaborative Development of a Virtual Reading Room Service

Heather Smedberg, University of California, San Diego
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/rz180xn4072

This presentation will explore UC San Diego Library’s approach to providing mediated online access to digital archival sources and the highly collaborative effort required to bring our Virtual Reading Room service to its current, pilot phase. The Virtual Reading room application extends the access control capabilities of our digital asset management system (DAMS) and builds a communication bridge between our Aeon instance and our DAMS to enhance researcher access and ease public services workflows

Providing Access on Tohono O'odham Nation

Sara Guzman, Himdag Ki - Tohono O’odham Nation Cultural Center & Museum
Persistent URL: purl.stanford.edu/zb349td2077

Project funding

IMLS logoThis project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, through grant LG-35-19-0012-19. The IMLS is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s libraries and museums. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov.

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