At a glance

Special Collections & University Archives

Exhibits

A Universe of Maps | Opening the David Rumsey Map Center

Image: Revolution annuelle de la terre autour du soleil, in Atlas classique et universel de geographie ancienne et moderne…
J. Andriveau-Goujon; H. Nicollet; E. Soulier
Paris: 1850

 

April 19 – August 31, 2016

A Universe of Maps: Opening the David Rumsey Map Center features an extraordinary selection of more than 150 rare and antiquarian maps, atlases, globes, and cartographic teaching materials, and celebrates the gift to the Stanford University Libraries of the David Rumsey Map Collection—one of the largest private map collections in the United States, comprising some 150,000 maps—and the opening of the center named for him. The David Rumsey Map Center is anchored by the Rumsey collection and augmented by other collections held in the libraries, including Glen McLaughlin’s Maps of California as an Island, the Oscar I. Norwich Maps of Africa, the Antiquarian Map Collection from Special Collections, and the historical maps from the Branner Earth Sciences Library. The Rumsey gift, building on these other collections, establishes a corpus of cartographic material that is unparalleled on the West Coast.

The exhibition aims to inform and delight visitors with the history, purposes, and scholarly potential of maps and other cartographic material. Well-known maps and atlases, such as the first edition of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark’s Account of the Expedition . . . , with its foldout map delineating their route through the West (1814) and Abraham Ortelius’s Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570), considered to the be first atlas, anchor the exhibition in the history of cartography. But the bulk of the display falls outside the neatline of tradition: A 19th-century Jain cosmological diagram hand-painted on cloth shares gallery space with a tactile atlas for use by the blind, an 1829 illustrated chart by J. Andriveau-Goujon showing the comparative lengths and heights of the principal mountains and rivers of the world, and A Chronological Picture of Nations, an 1836 timeline by Emma Willard that depicts the flow of historical events from 4004 BC to the 1830s as rivers of time on a single sheet.

Maps are visual and textual archives of historical information. Visitors to the exhibition will be able to peruse unusual representations of the Roman road network in the Peutinger Tables of 1619, and witness the beginnings of data visualization in Harry Beck’s pioneering 1933 map of the London Underground Railways. They will see an early 1907 road guide illustrated with photographs of each junction along the route and space for notes, an 1849 Map of the Gold Regions of California showing routes to California overland and by sea, and Coloney & Fairchild's 1866 Ribbon Map of the Father of Waters, which depicts the full length of the Mississippi River in an 11-foot by 2-inch retractable scroll.

Beautiful and enduring examples of 20th century graphic design are present as well: Lucien Boucher’s 1939 pictorial map advertisement for Air France; Leslie MacDonald Gill’s 1928 Country Bus-Services Map, a highly illustrated and embellished guide to the bus routes of greater London; and the iconic Beck’s map of the London Underground.

Novelty maps and teaching tools are featured as well, such as a map puzzle of the United States, an umbrella-type folding globe, a New York-to-San Francisco travel adventure game board, and the tiny, jewel-like  globe covered in fish-skin that opens to reveal the heavens inside.  School atlases demonstrate the importance of geography in 18th and 19th-century primary education. Several 19th-century maps created by schoolchildren are included.

Also on display is a series of contemporary solar-powered M0VA globes created using historic Cassini gores from the Rumsey collection and modern satellite imagery.

The physical objects on display represent the tip of the cartographic iceberg, providing an introduction to the range and depth of the physical collections, which are also readily available and accessible in digital format.

A digital representation of the exhibition is available at http://exhibits.stanford.edu

Access

A Universe of Maps is on display in Green Library, Stanford University, from April 19 – August 31, 2016.

View the exhibition on two levels of Green Library’s Bing Wing: in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda on the second floor, and in the David Rumsey Map Center on the fourth floor.  Entrance to the Map Center is through the second floor door off of the Rotunda.

Viewing hours for the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda (second floor):
Monday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Viewing hours for the David Rumsey Map Center (fourth floor):
Monday through Friday, 1-5 p.m. [beginning April 25, 2016]

Green Library closures vary with the academic schedule. To confirm library hours, call 650-723-0931 or go tohttp://library.stanford.edu/libraries_collections/hours_locations.html

For a map of campus and transportation information, go towww.stanford.edu/home/visitors/maps.html

 

NOTE: Visitors without Stanford ID must register with a government-issued photo ID at the entrance to Green Library before entering the building.

Joseph Goldyne: Books, Prints & Proofs

Poster artwork: Joseph Goldyne, "Appearances Pale Before Meaning."

EXTENDED THROUGH MARCH 13

The Stanford University Libraries' Department of Special Collections presents an exhibition of artists' books featuring monoprints, etchings, and monotypes by Joseph Goldyne. Studies and proofs from Goldyne's archive, a recent gift to the Stanford University Libraries, document the processes by which the images were created. Joseph Goldyne: Books, Prints & Proofs will be on display through March 13, 2016 in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda on the second floor of the Bing Wing of Green Library, Stanford University. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Born in Chicago in 1942, Goldyne earned an AB in art history from UC-Berkeley and an MD from UCSF before attending graduate school in fine arts at Harvard. A scholar as well as a practicing artist, he has written extensively about art and art collecting, and exhibited widely. His work is in numerous public art collections, including The Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, and Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Goldyne is devoted to printmaking on a small scale and to making unique images that combine painting, drawing, and printing techniques. A deep knowledge of art history, skilled rendering, imagination inspired by literary themes, and playful wit characterize the works on display, which span four decades of Goldyne's work in book and portfolio formats. Several of the books are collaborative efforts with notable designers, printers, and binders. Also included are numerous prints and unique books produced in collaboration with Master Calligrapher Thomas Ingmire.

The earliest work on display, the unique volume Women 9 (1976), is also the first of his collaborations with Ingmire. Nine monotypes pay homage to well-known paintings of women by artists who include Rembrandt van Rijn, Édouard Vuillard, and Pablo Picasso, and range from the contemplative to the surreal.

Another early work, Ten Firsts (1978), takes an ironic view of current artistic innovation. Goldyne assigned a pretentious, witty title proclaiming a "first" in some trifling, albeit unique, combination of subjects to each of the ten aquatints in the portfolio.

For Diary of a Young Girl (Het Achterhuis) (1985), a fortieth-anniversary publication of Anne Frank's diary issued in a limited edition by Pennyroyal Press, Goldyne traveled with his eleven-year-old daughter to Amsterdam to study the settings for the images. Ten etchings in a tall narrow format that conveys the confinement of the house as well as the literal point of view of its occupants accompany Frank's text.

Quartet (1986), published by Pacific Editions and designed and printed at Arif Press in Berkeley, features five monotypes by Goldyne and four essays by physician and essayist Dr. Lewis Thomas. Various state proofs of the images are on display along with a video created by Goldyne and Kay Bradner, who did the proofing of the prints, to instruct editioning printer Robert Townsend in the inking methods used to achieve the desired results.

Three of the artists' books on display represent Goldyne's recurrent collaborations with designer/printer Peter Koch, Berkeley, whose archive is also in Stanford's Special Collections. Five Ripe Pears (1996), a limited edition of the bittersweet children's story by William Saroyan, incorporates ten intaglio prints by Goldyne. Oda a la Tipografía | Ode to Typography (1998) by Pablo Neruda, translated by Stephen Kessler, is typeset in Spanish and English on facing pages and sequenced with six small-format aquatints.

Ink will still be wet on Hard High-Country Poems (2015) by Michelangelo Buonarroti Simoni, selected and translated into English by renowned Canadian author and translator Robert Bringhurst. The book includes a drypoint portrait of Michelangelo by Goldyne and is printed letterpress on vintage paper from hand-set Vicenza & Arrighi type formerly in the collection of Adrian Wilson at The Press in Tuscany Alley, San Francisco. It is issued with a companion volume about the type, The Typographic Legacy of Ludovico degli Arrighi.

Exhibition Catalogue
In conjunction with the exhibition, Joseph Goldyne: Catalogue Raisonné of Books, Portfolios, and Calligraphic Sheets includes an essay by Robert Bringhurst and contributions by several of Goldyne's collaborators, among them designer/printer Peter R. Koch; Master Printers Robert Townsend and Kay Bradner, and Master Calligrapher Thomas Ingmire. Select the publications tab for pricing and ordering information.

Access
Exhibit cases are illuminated daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The gallery is accessible whenever Green Library is open; hours vary with the academic schedule.To confirm library hours, call 650-723-0931 or go to http://library.stanford.edu/libraries_collections/hours_locations.htmlFor a map of campus and transportation information, go to http://www.stanford.edu/dept/visitorinfo/plan/maps.html

Note
The exhibition is free and open to the public; first-time visitors and those without Stanford ID must register at the entrance to Green Library before entering the building.

 

Closing August 30, 2015: Beasts & Books

Poster illustration from Monstrorum Historia by Ulysse Aldrovandi, (Bologna: 1642). Stanford University Libraries Special Collections, Barchas Collection QH41.A4 F vol. 6

A new exhibition in Stanford’s Green Library, curated by Stanford Ph.D. candidate in history Mackenzie Cooley with contributions by undergraduate students in her fall, 2014 course, “History/Femgen 29S: The Animal Other: Humans and Animals in Western History,” explores the interdependence between humans and animals through the lens of book culture. The exhibition of rare books and manuscripts from the Stanford University Libraries' Special Collections will be on display in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda, Green Library Bing Wing, April 6 through August 22, 2015.

Presented thematically in historical perspective, the exhibit considers diverse aspects of humans’ recorded encounters with and thinking about animals. Among the topics explored and illustrated are monsters of the deep as depicted in sixteenth-century maps; medieval bestiaries and Christian theology, natural history in the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods; animals in the New World; horsepower and equine training; bullfighting, masculinity and the culture of hunting; animals as metaphor in the fables of Aesop; Descartes and the “beast-machine;” ethics of consumption of animal flesh; and animals in children’s literature.

The exhibition draws out changes in the nature of animal-human relationships as Western society shifted from domesticity into a post-domestic world, and shows how human knowledge was written onto animals, literally and metaphorically. While medieval manuscripts recorded knowledge on parchment, animals metaphorically functioned as “the other” — the non-person, against which the characteristics of personhood and humanity were defined. Through natural histories, philosophers grappled with the diversity of the natural world, questioning and reaffirming what (if anything) made human beings special within it. By collecting and analyzing animal bodies, humans have continued to define their purpose and uniqueness within the world.

Notes Paula Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History at Stanford University, “The exhibition invites you to think about the long history of beasts in books from antiquity to the present day. It explores the wealth of rare materials in Stanford University Libraries related to this subject, selecting some of the most interesting items that permit us to trace this theme between history, science, fiction, graphic illustration, and lived experience. There will always be beasts in books. How and why animals haunt our imagination and challenge our understanding of our world – and our place within it in relation to them – lies at the heart of this delightful and thought-provoking exhibit.”

Viewing hours are Monday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Green Library closures vary with the academic schedule. To confirm library hours, call 650-723-0931 or go to http://library.stanford.edu/libraries_collections/hours_locations.html

NOTE: Visitors without Stanford ID must register with a government-issued ID at the entrance to Green Library before entering the building.

For a map of campus and transportation information, go to www.stanford.edu/home/visitors/maps.html

 

"Movements for Change" EXTENDED through March 18, 2015

 

Poster features a photograph of Martin Luther King Jr. shaking hands with civil rights activist Annie Devine, surrounded by press and supporters during a break in the Meredith March Against Fear. Canton, Mississippi, 1966.

Photographs of key moments in American civil rights history and farm worker organizing of the 1960s and 1970s by Watsonville, California photographer Bob Fitch are on exhibit in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda of Stanford's Green Library from September 30, 2014 through March 18, 2015. The exhibition, Movements for Change: The Bob Fitch Photography Archive at Stanford Libraries, marks the Libraries' acquisition of the Fitch archive of close to 275,000 images for use by students and scholars, and celebrates the people whose lives and work Fitch documented.

In 1965, Bob Fitch was an Anglo seminary student at the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California when he read James Baldwin's The Fire Next Time as a class assignment. The experience moved him to pursue work as an activist rather than to minister from the pulpit. He purchased used professional camera equipment and began to photograph, working first with Glide Church in San Francisco and then as a volunteer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in Atlanta from 1965 to 1968. In the South he worked closely with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others, documenting civil rights activities and serving as a wire service-“from camera click to stamp lick”- for the African American press, which could not risk sending their own correspondents into the field. Along the way, he deepened his commitment to social justice activism and his appreciation of the people who make up movements for change. 

He continued to photograph for the next fifty years, documenting the work of Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers, Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement, the Vietnam War draft resistance movement, and Ron Dellums's first congressional campaign, among many other social justice-related subjects. Most recently, Fitch photographed Luis Alejo's 2010 campaign for California State Assembly.

Iconic Fitch photographs from the mid-1960s through the mid-1970s are displayed in Movements for Change: The Bob Fitch Photography Archive at Stanford Libraries. The exhibit offers a window into the work of a lifelong photographer who views himself as “an organizer who uses a camera to tell the story of the work.” Some of the images, such as that of Martin Luther King Jr. in his office (used as a basis for the King memorial in Washington, DC), of Coretta Scott King comforting daughter Bernice on her lap at her husband's funeral, and of Dorothy Day passively resisting armed police from a folding stool, will be familiar to many. Other lesser known images, of African American voter education and registration efforts, marchers and hecklers along the route of the Mississippi Meredith March, the King family in the days immediately following King's assassination, United Farm Workers organizing, the Vietnam War draft resistance movement may alternately surprise and move those who view them.

Viewing hours are Monday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Green Library closures vary with the academic schedule. To confirm library hours, call 650-723-0931 or go to http://library.stanford.edu/libraries_collections/hours_locations.html

For a map of campus and transportation information, go to www.stanford.edu/home/visitors/maps.html

NOTE: Visitors without Stanford ID must register with a government-issued ID at the entrance to Green Library before entering the building.

 

On view summer 2014

After Hours Exhibit Poster

 

After Hours: Creative Pursuits of Stanford University Libraries Staff

Creative people are everywhere, including in the library, as demonstrated by the exhibit “After Hours: Creative Pursuits of Stanford University Libraries Staff,” on display in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda of Stanford’s Green Library from June 26 through August 27, 2014. 

The exhibit features almost fifty works of art and artisanship created by more than thirty staff from all corners of the organization, in media as widely varied as the job titles of their creators. In addition to traditional fine art techniques of drawing, painting, printmaking, and photography, the show includes mixed media sculpture, stone carving, ceramics, collage, textiles, costuming, and creative writing. Each artist contributed a brief statement about the how and why of their creative process to accompany their work in the show.

Among the works on display are charcoal-on-paper gesture studies by Ray Heigemeir, (Public Services Librarian, Music Library), aquatint etchings by Sarah Newton (Conservation Assistant, Preservation Department), wet plate collodion photographic prints by Richard Webber (Associate Director, Enterprise Systems and Programming), a pair of quilts abstracted from a photograph of a Mountain View alley by Amy Hodge (Science Data Librarian, Branner Earth Sciences Library), and a roman capital alphabet, hand drawn and V-cut from limestone using a mallet and chisel by David Brock (Conservator, Conservation & Preservation).

Map Cow This Is, a large-scale watercolor painting on plywood by Everardo Rodriguez (Library Specialist, Latin American Collections), superimposes a map of the United States on the image of a calf and uses a play on the words “mad cow disease” to comment on the US invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq during the War on Terror. Safety Zone, a fleet of painted model ships by Angela Tsai (Technical Administrative Assistant, Library Director’s Office), employs the metaphor of dazzle camouflage to explore and convey issues of racial and cultural assimilation.

Repurposed materials are the stuff of several pieces in the exhibition, including Pozitizer 3, a mixed media sculpture by Bruce Lundquist (Senior Designer, Stanford University Press), which he says “arose out of a box of odd pieces of hardware, a conversation with an eccentric rock hound about the powers of various stones, and an affinity for stacking things.” Altered books figure in collages by Justine Withers (Data Control Specialist, Technical Services), and in the diorama Mask of the Red Death—an homage to the Edgar Allan Poe story—by Laszlo Jakusovszky (Operations Manager for Media and Microtext). Junk Jewelry Box & Brooch by Becky Fischbach (Exhibits Designer, Special Collections)is assembled from salvaged copper sheeting, weathered bottle caps, and plastic mesh.

Computer graphics come into play in “Custom Orthotics Changed My Life,” a work of slideshow fiction in the form of a short movie produced using Keynote and QuickTime by Rich Holeton (Director, Academic Computing Services).

Exhibit cases are illuminated Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. The gallery is accessible whenever Green Library is open; hours vary with the academic schedule. To confirm library hours, call 650-723-0931 or go to http://library.stanford.edu/libraries_collections/hours_locations.html

For a map of campus and transportation information, go to www.stanford.edu/home/visitors/maps.html

NOTE: The exhibition is free and open to the public; first-time visitors and those without Stanford ID must register at the entrance to Green Library before entering the building.

On view February 3 — June 15, 2014

 Image from the Dragmaticon, Italy, c. 1450-1499. Stanford University Libraries MSS Codex M0412

The Circle of the Sun: Secular Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts

The Circle of the Sun, the second of a pair of exhibitions of Western European manuscripts and fragments, will open in the Peterson Gallery, Green Library, Stanford University on Feb. 3. The exhibition draws on Stanford's medieval and early modern manuscript holdings, including a number of recent acquisitions, to show how secular learning was recorded and transmitted in complex networks and communities of textual production and interpretation.
 
From antiquity, scholars divided knowledge into res divinae (sacred) and res humanae (secular). The 2012 exhibit Scripting the Sacred featured religious writings, many of which were splendidly illuminated. The Circle of the Sun examines the seven liberal arts in cathedral schools and universities; the rise of professions in law, medicine, and commerce; and the emergence of Scholastic philosophy, history, vernacular literature, and Renaissance humanism.
 
Today, manuscript studies is a highly interdisciplinary and increasingly digital field for which paleography, the study of old writing, remains a fundamental tool. Paleography was first used scientifically to detect forgeries in diplomatic documents; its principles were later applied to related academic disciplines such as epigraphy, textual criticism, and codicology, which are also discussed in the exhibition.
 
Highlights of manuscripts on display, dating from the ninth through seventeenth centuries, include complete codices of ancient works by Ovid, Vergil, and Cicero; illustrated astronomical and legal texts; a portrait of Geoffrey Chaucer; medieval poetry; and fragments of rarely seen treatises on Latin lexicography, etymology, and allegory. Visitors will also see a selection of Roman writing implements, coins and inscriptions as well as goatskins prepared as parchment by a modern artisan.
 
The Circle of the Sun is co-curated by Sarah Temmer Weston, Class of 2014, English and Art History and David A. Jordan, assistant director for library development and associate curator for paleographical materials. Curated tours lasting approximately 45 minutes are available to classes and community groups (suggested maximum of 12-15) by appointment with David Jordan at 650-723-3866 or dajordan@stanford.edu.
 
Exhibit cases are illuminated Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. The gallery is accessible whenever Green Library is open; hours vary with the academic schedule. To confirm library hours, call 650-723-0931 or go to http://library.stanford.edu/libraries_collections/hours_locations.html

For a map of campus and transportation information, go to http://www.stanford.edu/dept/visitorinfo/plan/maps.html

NOTE: The exhibition is free and open to the public; first-time visitors and those without Stanford ID must register at the entrance to Green Library before entering the building.