At a glance

Special Collections & University Archives

Manuscripts Division

The Manuscripts Division of the Department of Special Collections exists to arrange, describe, preserve, and make available documents and born-digital materials of enduring historic value, both as intellectual items and as historical artifacts, to support the research needs of the undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and other scholars at Stanford University and beyond. Stanford University Library subject curators actively seek out collections to enhance our holdings. Since 2009, Special Collections has been involved in developing a Born-Digital Program in collaboration with the Digital Library Systems and Services Department.

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The Stanford ePADD team has been invited to demo the software at the Computation + Journalism Symposium 2016. Demonstrations will take place on September 30, 5-7 pm, in the courtyard adjacent to Paul Brest Hall on the Stanford campus.

Soon after, in early October, we will head to New York for our partner meeting, to discuss specifications for version 3.0, which is expected to release in February 2017. New York University has graciously offered to host our two-day meeting.
 
Stanford University Libraries in Redwood City - construction photo

Most of the community is aware of the planned development for Stanford’s Redwood City Campus. What few of you may be aware of is that four departments from the Stanford University Libraries (SUL) moved out to Redwood City three years ago. We have been working out of 425 Broadway which is one of the buildings slated for demolition. The development of the new campus necessitates SUL’s relocation from 425 across the street to 500 Broadway – the former home of AMPEX.

The four units moving are: Stanford University Press, Conservation Services, Stanford Media Preservation Lab, and Technical Services branch of Special Collections. SUL staff in these four units have been working for over a year with SUL’s Facilities Department on planning for this interim space. I say interim, because in another 2.5 years, we’ll be moving back onto the new campus. 

An assortment of photos from the Kojima family papers

A few weekends ago I went to the relatively-newly reopened SFMOMA. Their exhibition "About Time: Photography in a Moment of Change" features artist Jason Lazarus' installation Recordings #3 (At sea), 2014-2016. It's a wall of found photographs hung so that the actual photograph faces the wall, with only the text written on the back of the photo visible to the viewer.