At a glance

Special Collections & University Archives

About the Archives

Leland Stanford, Jr. on his pony, 1879The Archives was created in 1965 by the Board of Trustees to collect, preserve, and make available the historically and legally valuable records of the University and of Stanford community members. Adjunct to this responsibility is the collecting of all materials relating to the University's founders, Leland and Jane Lathrop Stanford, and to those family members who were associated with them in business ventures or the creation of Stanford University.

News

Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), Through the Looking Glass: A Radical Guide to Stanford

The University Archives is pleased to annouce the availability of three new online exhibits: Board of Trustees Records, Faculty Senate Records, and Stanford Publications.

The Board of Trustees exhibit includes agendas, minutes, photographs, and directories documenting the administrative history of the Board of Trustees. The site features scanned and born-digital records held by the University Archives. Since this is an ongoing digitization project, not all materials are available online. What is available are minutes (1936-2016) and agendas (1906-1908, 1955-1985, 2005-2016). For a full listing of materials held by the Archives please visit: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/c8dn43h8. Note: Board of Trustees records are restricted 20 years from date of creation.

The Faculty Senate exhibit is the culmination of a collaborative project with the Academic Secretary's office to digitize and make available administrative records of the Faculty Senate. The site includes minutes, agendas, supporting materials, and photographs documeting the founding and history of the Faculty Senate. Note: agendas and minutes are restricted to the Stanford community; supporting materials (except for memorial resolutions) are restricted 20 years from date of creation. Look for a physical exhibit in 2018 to honor the 50th anniversary of the Faculty Senate.

The Stanford publications exhibit brings together a variety publications documenting Stanford University. Included are course catalogs, directories, newspapers, newsletters, magazines, journals, and more. Especially noteworthy are student publications. This, too, is an ongoing digitization project and materials will be added here as they become available. Look for additional publications from women's organizations, the LGBT community, and communities of color.

New acquisitions

Rally the Resistance Rally, 2017

The Stanford University Archives is proud to announce an ongoing initiative to acquire, process and digitize materials documenting Stanford women, the LGBTQ community, and communities of color. Following on the heels of its Stanford Stories exhibit carried out for the University’s 125th Anniversary, the Archives seeks to expand the range of voices and materials in its collections representing Stanford’s rich history. To that extent, we are happy to share our progress thus far.

Antigone.

This year, Stanford Classics turns 125, and to celebrate, we have put together an exhibit examining its early history. While small and undistinguished early on, the department quickly produced scholars of distinction. Today it is a major center of American classics, and a world leader in the study of ancient Greece and Rome. Still, the century and a quarter that intervenes between us and its foundation is often a sort of ever-advancing black box—that is, we seldom have an institutional memory that extends any further back than the recollection of the faculty's most senior member. Earlier outlines of the department's history are therefore simply lost. This exhibit hopes to shed some light on that earlier place and time.

GSB in China, 2002

The Stanford University Archives is pleased to announce that it has recently acquired, and made available, two collections from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Stanford University, Graduate School of Business, Records (SC1266)

Founded in 1925, The Stanford Graduate School of Business was formed in order to establish a West Coast alternative to the business schools of the East Coast.

University Archives staff transfer the media from the flooded offices of the NACC in Old Union

The Stanford University Archives is pleased to announce that it recently accessioned extensive media holdings from the Native American Cultural Center (NACC), including reel-to-reel language tapes, and VHS tapes and DVDs containing recordings of Native Research Forums, the Hanitchak Lecture Series, Native Graduation, and Hall of Fame Induction and Alumni Dinner events. Also included in the transfer are photographs of Native alumni, copies of the Stanford Native Community newsletter, and posters of the Stanford Powwow. All materials date from 1970-2014.

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