At a glance

Branner Earth Sciences Library & Map Collections

Branner Library News

Lake Surprise Research by Daniel Ibarra from http://purl.stanford.edu/zd652gs8988

It is no longer a surprise how ancient lakes in the western US -- such as Lake Surprise -- managed to become so large. Research undertaken by Daniel Ibarra, a graduate student working at the time with Kate Maher, assistant professor of geological and environmental sciences, showed that the root cause was a lower rate of evaporation than we see today.

Corn, by Flickr user spakattacks CC BY-2.0

Climate change is all over the news these days, and when a report in the journal Science indicates potential impacts on the future of food production in the US, people sit up and take notice.

David Lobell, associate professor of environmental Earth system science and associate director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment, led a team that analyzed data on corn and soybean production along with daily weather data in actual fields in the Midwestern United States.

The large dataset of crop and weather information compiled for these studies is now available for download from the Stanford Digital Repository. It's great that the accumulated effort this data set represents is now preserved and available for other scientists to use!

"[T]he oceans have always belonged to the clams."

At least from a metabolic perspective, according to Earth Sciences Professor Jonathan Payne and his co-authors. The researchers have just published an article in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences about the struggle for dominance between brachiopods and bivalves.

Planisfero del mondo vecchio, 1691?

Hemispheres in cartography refer to slicing the globe into spherical halves. Generally, hemispheres we see in maps are Northern or Southern, where the equator is the dividing line and Eastern and Western, or where the prime meridian, East and West of 180˚ longitude, bisects the two. 

A collection of six maps from Glen McLaughlin's Map Collection of California as an Island, give you a peek at a few hemispheric maps published between 1683 and 1807 and show how hemispheres were sliced differently on maps between the 17th and 19th century. Visit Branner Library to view them in person. The exhibit will run from until April 23, 2014.

San Francisco from the David Rumsey Map Collection: SFO Airport Exhibit

The new exhibit installed at the San Francisco International Airport Museum, comes from the David Rumsey Map Collection, with a few items from Stanford University Libraries and the San Francisco Public Library.  Exhibited in a magnificent space, these iconic set of maps are at the airport exhibition gallery in Terminal 2 (Virgin America and American Airlines). The exhibit is accessible after going through security. The exhibit combines the original maps with digital representations and includes videos and Google Earth overlays.

For more on the exhibit, see their press release.

Check out what Wired has to say about it! Also David himself has blogged about it.

The exhibit is currently open and will remain so until August 3, 2014. If you cannot make it, check out a selection showcased in the digital gallery. You can also browse them in detail at davidrumsey.com.

Many thanks to my colleagues at Branner, Preservation and Special Collections for supporting this exhibit.

 

New Resources in Branner Library

Following is a listing of new print and e-books recently added to the Branner Earth Sciences Library.

  1. Earth Sciences Library (Branner) » Stacks » QE1 .S6435 V.13

  2. map compiled by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Planning Division. 2014

    Earth Sciences Library (Branner) » Map cases » G3951 .P2 2014 .K4

  3. edited by F. Jourdan, Curtin University, Australia, D.F. Mark, Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, UK, and C. Verati, University of Nice, France. 2014

    Earth Sciences Library (Branner) » Stacks » QE1 .G4745 NO.378

  4. Earth Sciences Library (Branner) » Stacks » (No call number)