At a glance

Cecil H. Green Library

Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez died yesterday in Mexico City at the age of 87.

Márquez, whose novels include One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera, received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982 "for his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent's life and conflicts." You can read more about García Márquez in the Dictionary of Literary Biography.

You can discover in SearchWorks books by García Márquez and films based on his work.

Available here is a Democracy Now! interview with Chilean writer Isabel Allende on the life and work of García Márquez.

 

The moon turns red and orange during a total lunar eclipse.

Tonight -- if you can stay up past your bedtime -- you can view a total lunar eclipse: the Moon will pass completely through the Earth's shadow. The partial eclipse begins at 10:58 pm PDT and ends at 2:33 tomorrow morning; the greatest eclipse takes place at 12:46 am. 

If you can't stay up past your bedtime, you can always take a look at SearchWorks for titles about lunar eclipses. There's also a primer on lunar eclipses available here.

The Archive of Recorded Sound recently collaborated with the Bing Stanford in Washington program to provide digitized images from the Archive's Grover Sales Collection (ARS.0016) for an evening event at the program in late January which served to launch both a new arts track at Bing Stanford in Washington, and provide students from both Stanford and nearby Duke Ellington School of the Arts with an insight into the role jazz played in African American history and civil rights through the early to middle part of the 20th century.  The event  featured a display of enlarged wall mounted images of Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, and Ethel Waters, sourced from the Grover Sales Collection, digitized from 35mm negative slides. Grover Sales (1920-2004), a Bay Area author, jazz critic, and teacher, who regularly taught jazz history here at Stanford, amassed the image portion of his collection from various sources for use during his classes.  
Donald Pippin, Artistic Director of Pocket Opera

Since 1952 Donald Pippin has been a part of the musical life of San Francisco. He is best known as the founder of Pocket Opera, which started in 1977 with the purpose of making opera more accessible to the average concert goer by presenting opera in unique English language translations with a small chamber ensemble. The Donald Pippin Collection consists primarily of Pippin's English translations of opera librettos available as pdf files. Follow the links in the finding aid to download the files.