COVID-19 Libraries update

All libraries are CLOSED due to poor air quality. Online services are available.
For updates visit library.stanford.edu/alerts.

Access to campus libraries is limited. Please explore our online resources & services. We’re here, ask us!

University Archives

Rally the Resistance Rally, 2017
Stanford Prison Experiment
Stanford University by Edward M. Farmer, 1934
Stanford family
Stanford Arts Institute
The horse in motion
Gaieties, 2008
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Stanford Powwow, 2006
Cornerstone laying, 1887
ReMix 2007
Rose Bowl--1971, Jim Plunkett
1 of 12

COVID-19 Community Archiving Project

Records of your experience will support current and future students, faculty, and others who will want to understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has uprooted our community and transformed our work and lives.

Stanford Letters Project

Help us transcribe Stanford history! These letters, diaries, and other materials help tell the story of Stanford.

Spotlight at Stanford: University Archives

These online exhibits showcase materials from the Stanford University Archives, including photographs, audiovisual materials, publications, and maps and architectural drawings.

Follow us

Stanford Archives News

Stanford Special Collections & University Archives share statement on potentially harmful language in cataloging and archival description

September 9, 2020
by Ann K.D. Myers

Stanford Libraries’ Department of Special Collections and University Archives has published a Statement on Potentially Harmful Language in Cataloging and Archival Description. The statement was developed by staff across the department over the past two months, with additional input from staff in Stanford Libraries’ Metadata Development Unit...

The First Women's suffrage Picket Line-College Day in the picket line

Stanford University and the Women’s Suffrage Movement

August 26, 2020
by Presley A Hubschmitt

On this day, 100 years ago, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States was ratified, which provided some women the right to vote. The process that led to the ratification of the 19th Amendment can provide historical context for the voting and women’s rights issues that are still at the forefront of American politics today. Although it took until 1920 for the 19th Amendment to be ratified, states like California were attempting to pass women’s suffrage laws beginning in the 1890s. In 1911, Californians finally passed a referendum granting women the right to vote in the state. With the suffrage movement making headway in California politics, Stanford University also felt the stirrings of the movement on campus.

accessibilityaccessprivsarrow-circle-rightaskus-chataskus-librarianbarsblogsclosecoffeecomputercomputersulcontactsconversationcopierelectricaloutleteventsexternal-linkfacebook-circlegroupstudyhoursindividualinterlibrarynewsnextoffcampusopenlateoutdoorpeoplepolicypreviousprinterprojectsquietreservesscannersearchstudysupportingtabletourstwitter-circleworking