At a glance

Music Library

Featured issue:

[Washington, etc., 1934- ]
Music Library » Stacks » ML25 .M98 V.70:NO.3-4 2014
Stanford Music is particularly well represented in the September issue of Notes. See the article, "Hybrid Critical Editions of Opera: Motives, Milestones, and Quandaries," by Eleanor Selfridge-Field, and reviews of Sound Play: Video Games and the Musical Imagination, by William Cheng, and Byrd, by Kerry McCarthy. Additional items reviewed include Fritz Hennenberg's Victor Fenigstein: Lebensprotokoll, Werkkommentare, Kataloge (Tysen Dauer, reviewer) and Peter Franklin's Reclaiming Late-Romantic Music: Singing Devils and Distant Sounds (Erinn Knytt, reviewer).  Available online to Stanford readers.

Music news

Rite of Spring, facsimile (detail)

For your browsing pleasure, we present the following list of new scores added to composer complete editions, historical sets, and facsimiles:

 

Modern editions:

Rossini. Sei Sonate a Quattro per Violini, violoncello e contrabbasso. Edizione critica delle opere di Gioachino Rossini / comitato di redazione, Bruno Cagli, Philip Gossett, Alberto Zedda (ser.6/4)

Schönberg. Serenade, op. 24. Sämtliche Werke / Arnold Schönberg ; herausgegeben von Josef Rufer (Abt. VI: Kammermusik, Reihe B, Bd. 23/1)

Recording date on a Welte-Mignon roll label

How do you know a publication date? For most books, simply look for the copyright or edition information at the beginning. For mass produced modern CDs, check the edge of the disc surface for the “p date”, or maybe it will be in the booklet inserted into the container. But what about piano rolls for reproducing and player pianos? Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound’s Player Piano Project faces this question. The publication date certainly isn’t stamped on the label, yet we need it.

Theremin demonstrating his instrument, Stanford University, 1991

Earlier this year, I reported on recent work the Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) had undertaken to preserve video footage of Leon Theremin's visit to Stanford in 1991. In addition to participating in a symposium during his visit, hosted by the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), Theremin was also the guest of honor at a concert held in Frost Amphitheater on September 27, 1991 during the Stanford Centennial Finale Weekend. The video footage preserved by the ARS earlier in the year unfortunately only included part of this notable concert. It was found to be missing some key performances, including an arrangement of Rachmaninov's Vocalise, featuring Theremin's daughter Natasha Theremin playing the vocal parts on her father's instrument, accompanied by Max Mathews conducting the orchestral parts with his radio batons. This footage was presumed lost...until now.